TEDMED Blog

Entrancing dance: Q&A with Art of Motion Dance Theatre

Art of Motion Dance Theatre, known for using dance to explore body and mind as creative instruments, performed a piece celebrating the divinity of nature at TEDMED 2014. We reached out to learn more about their art.

Art of Motion Dance Theatre, a modern repertory dance company, at TEDMED 2014. [Robert Benson for TEDMED.]

Art of Motion Dance Theatre, a modern repertory dance company, at TEDMED 2014. [Robert Benson for TEDMED.]

What is the legacy you want to leave? 

We hope to have vicariously reached our audiences and impacted the way they see dance, understand the complexity of the human body, brain, mind and spirit. The AOMDT’s unique movement vocabulary and repertoire seeks to impact communities with its cocktail of motion fusing elements of street dance with eastern and western vocabularies including the formality of classical ballet, the abstraction of modern dance and the discipline of yoga. We rely and thrive on the collaborative process.

Art of Motion Dance Theatre at TEDMED 2014. [Sandy Huffaker for TEDMED.]

Art of Motion Dance Theatre, a modern repertory dance company, at TEDMED 2014. [Sandy Huffaker for TEDMED.]

What is next for Art of Motion Dance Theatre? 

The AOMDT continues to create new work, perform, tour, teach and collaborate with musicians, orchestras, costume and lighting designers. We are working on varied projects from a “Salute to Disney Homage” to an evening of live music to a new, avant garde work with a NYC composer, Richard Carrick. Richard wrote the score for “Prisoner’s Cinema,” and created a film based on research of prisoners in solitary confinement. We are also creating an in-depth evening inspired by the “Secret Life of Plants.”

Learn more about AOMDT’s experience at TEDMED 2014 here or check out their website for upcoming performances.

What gets your heart racing? Q&A with Foteini Agrafioti

At TEDMED 2014, Foteini Agrafioti raised concerns about today’s passwords and IDs, and shared how your body may provide easier, and more accurate, forms of identification. We reached out to her to learn more about what inspires her work.

"The million dollar question is are biometrics secure? James Bond would have you believe so." - Foteini Agrafioti on the TEDMED 2014 Stage [Photo: Kevork Djansezian]

“The million dollar question is are biometrics secure? James Bond would have you believe so.” – Foteini Agrafioti on the TEDMED 2014 Stage [Photo: Kevork Djansezian]

 

What motivated you to speak at TEDMED?

I felt the need to provide a different perspective on biometric security. Our world is evolving so quickly, and biometric authentication has made its way into our lives. I want people to understand the challenges, limitations and implications of this technology.

Who or what has been your main source of inspiration that drives you to innovate?

There is no specific source of inspiration. I go by two rules: 1) never get comfortable and 2) surround myself with people who want to disturb the status quo. It all starts with crazy “what ifs…”. We then quickly test those hypotheses and that’s how the innovation journey begins.

What advice would you give to other aspiring innovators and entrepreneurs?

Obsess! If you are to challenge the status-quo, you had better obsess about it. Protect your vision in the face of abundant skepticism and never give up. You won’t make an impact just by trying – you must go all the way. In the last decade, I can recall many times that people told me that I was set up for failure. Wouldn’t it be a shame if I had believed them?

What’s next for you?

After leaving Nymi, I joined Architech and founded Architech Labs to do research in the area of human computer interaction. My vision is to build technologies that understand the underlying factors of human behaviors and habits. I am now experimenting with affective computing – the engineering field that studies the human emotion. I believe that emotional intelligence is the last barrier to meaningful human-computer interaction and I am thrilled to be working on this.

A chat about guts and brains

Join TEDMED Speaker John Cryan for a Twitter Chat about the gut-brain connection this Thursday, March 19 at 2:30pm.
Do you want to learn more about the research behind John Cryan’s TEDMED talk, “Food for thought: How gut microbes change your mind”?

As part of Society for Neuroscience’s #BrainWeek, TEDMED is hosting a Twitter Chat with John from 2:30-3:30pm (ET) this Thursday, March 19.

Delve a little deeper into John’s talk and learn more from him about the gut-brain connection.

Tweet your questions using the #TEDMED hashtag!

Meanwhile, watch and share John’s talk to learn more and check out his recommended reading + podcasts.

We’re looking forward to an insightful, collaborative discussion and hope you will join us then!

 

 

 

Pursuing Mobility: Q&A with Cole Galloway

James “Cole” Galloway, Director of the Pediatric Mobility Lab and Design Studio and Professor at the University of Delaware, revealed an unusual and inspiring way to unlock children’s social, emotional, and cognitive skills. We interviewed Cole to learn more.

Pursuing Mobility. Cole Galloway at TEDMED 2014. [Photo: Sandy Huffaker, for TEDMED]

Cole Galloway at TEDMED 2014. [Photo: Sandy Huffaker, for TEDMED]

Why does this talk matter now? What impact do you hope the talk will have?

This talk matters now because every day that kids sit when they could be moving is a day that can never be regained in their emotional, cognitive, and social development. Children’s inability to move and play has alarming implications for their future, and we can’t sit back and wait for data to be collected or companies to assess the economic feasibility of new devices. We started with high-tech custom robot-controlled vehicles, but we quickly realized that we couldn’t meet demand — we had parents begging us for help. That’s why we turned to off-the-shelf ride-on cars that we could adapt in the lab. The greatest impact the talk could have would be for people across the globe to get involved in adapting cars for children in their own communities. Waiting is not an option when it comes to kids.

What is the legacy you want to leave?

The obvious legacy is the development of simple, elegant mobility solutions for people with special needs — solutions that can be implemented by ordinary people who want to make a difference. I hope that people everywhere get the message about how important mobility is — how critical it is to people’s ability to respect themselves and to gain the respect of others.

Beyond that, I hope I’m remembered for not just what I did but how I did it — not only the product but the process — by inviting anyone who could contribute to join me in this effort. I’ve worked with students at all levels (elementary to post doctoral fellows), faculty, clinicians, family members, and business owners. I’ve collaborated with engineers, various types of therapists, food scientists, writers, restaurateurs, fashion designers, marketing professionals, videographers, museum curators, and graphic designers. If you want to accomplish big things, have a big “party” and invite people who have big ideas.

Is there anything else you wish you could have included in your talk?

Mobility is a human right. Sound overstated? I dare you to: a) look at the definition of a ‘human right’, b) think a bit about how movement and mobility influence your life (not just your ability to get around, but what that ‘getting around’ means to your thinking, planning, happiness, friendships – all the best things in life and then, c) restrict your mobility to some small degree for an hour.  Mobility is a human right.

What’s next for you?

Playgrounds! An experimental playground lab – at Disney!

More than a gut feeling: Q&A with John Cryan

John Cryan, a neuropharmacologist and microbiome expert from the University College Cork, reveals surprising and perhaps strange facts and insights about how our thoughts and emotions are connected to our guts.

Butterflies in the brain? Neuroscientist and microbiome expert at TEDMED 2014 [Photo: Sandy Huffaker for TEDMED].

Butterflies in the brain? Neuroscientist and microbiome expert at TEDMED 2014 [Photo: Sandy Huffaker for TEDMED].

What motivated you to speak at TEDMED?

It is an amazing opportunity to put forward a relatively novel concept, in my case that the microbiome may be a key regulator of brain function. The microbiome is one of the hottest areas in medicine and this opportunity allowed me to bring this within a neuroscience context.

Why does this talk matter now? What impact do you hope the talk will have?

The talk summarizes the research on microbe-brain interactions. This is a rapidly evolving field and truly multidisciplinary in nature; I hope my talk reflects this. This research has implications across many aspects of medicine, including psychiatry, gastroenterology, obstetrics, gynecology and pediatrics.

Is there anything else you wish you could have included in your talk?

Recently, we have been focusing on why, from an evolutionary context, microbe-brain interactions emerged; I wasn’t able to go into this very much during my talk. At TEDMED I talked about how bacteria are required for brain development and social behavior but don’t ask why; in a recent paper we collaborated with the evolutionary microbiologist Seth Bordenstein from Vanderbilt to discuss some of the reasons behind this.

What’s next for you?

Right now we are looking to understand the mechanisms as to how microbes could influence the brain. Moreover, we are investigating the impact of naturalistic disturbances of the microbiota on brain function and behaviours such as Cesarean delivery, antibiotic use and early life stress.

Join us for a live Twitter Chat with John at 2:30pm EST on Thursday, March 19, as part of Brain Awareness Week! Tweet your advance questions #TEDMED and #BrainWeek. Check back on our blog for chat topics!

A better organ-ized kidney solution: Q&A with Sigrid Fry-Revere

Sigrid Fry-Revere, Founder and President of the Center for Ethical Solutions, discusses issues around organ transplantation policy and provides an inspiring and cost-effective living organ donation solution from Iran. We learned more about her work and vision.

Sigrid Fry-Revere discusses living kidney donation solutions at TEDMED 2014 [Photo: Sandy Huffaker for TEDMED]

Sigrid Fry-Revere discusses living kidney donation solutions at TEDMED 2014 [Photo: Sandy Huffaker for TEDMED]

What motivated you to speak at TEDMED?

I was terrified of the thought of speaking before so many people, but I knew my research in Iran and experience as a rejected living organ donor could save lives.

What impact do you hope the talk will have?

We need to rethink conventional paradigms used for donor kidney shortage. Increasing the proportion of cadaveric kidney donation, while helpful, will never be enough. And, as it relates to living donation, it is not simply a question of whether we allow only altruistic (non-compensated) donations or whether we allow a market. Neither a market system nor pure altruism are necessarily the answer, however compensating living organ donors so that they don’t suffer financial consequences for their altruism is certainly a start. Assisting donors with meeting their expenses, or expressing gratitude with gifts or benefits does not diminish their altruism. Unfortunately, policies that limit efforts to to ensure fiscal health of donors makes taking part in the act of helping friends and family who need transplants a privilege only the wealthy can afford.

What’s next for you?

I want to to spur discussion and change, and to this end, I founded two organizations. Stop Organ Trafficking Now! is lobbying Congress to pay more attention to living organ donation and the rights and needs of those living organ donors. Making living organ donation easier means fewer Americans will brave black market organ trafficking channels to try to save themselves or their loved ones. I also co-founded a charity based on my experiences in Iran. The American Living Organ Donor Fund (ALODF) is a living organ donor support organization that provides information, an online donor support group, and financial assistance with non-medical donation related expenses. ALODF exists to support all kinds of living organ donors – kidney, liver, bone marrow and others – but to date only kidney donors have applied. My research has given me a good idea of what needs are alleviated for Iranian living donors in order to to ease the burden of donation. We lack such data for other countries, including our own, so I intend for the ALODF’s efforts to include learning more about the needs of American living organ donors. The American Living Organ Donor Fund has already made more transplants possible for U.S. citizens in its two and a half month existence than some government funded Organ Procurement Organizations (OPOs) average per month. How is this possible? For one, OPOs focus almost entirely on retrieving organs from deceased donors. Cadaveric organ retrieval is expensive and far less productive than live organ transplants. OPOs receive on average $50,000 per kidney retrieval, and as many as 20% of those organs are not viable for transplant. In the last two and a half months, the ALODF has helped 30 Americans receive transplants by helping their living organ donors with out-of-pocket expenses, spending on average $2,500 per donor. If you do the math, that is twenty times less per transplant than what an OPO receives per transplant.

Any corrections to your talk since you gave it?

In both my book and my TEDMED talk I mention that the Fars Province in Iran (an area surrounding the city of Shiraz) doesn’t allow compensating donors beyond the federal government contribution given to all living donors to help cover expenses. Dr. Malek-Hosseini, the head of the transplant program in Shiraz, Iran, notified me in November 2014 that his province no longer allows any unrelated donors. He believes this will  help prevent the illegal payments or black market sales or kidneys that were occurring in his province. Note, no other region in Iran that I know of has banned paying donors or placed such restrictions on relatedness of donors by blood, adoption, or marriage. However it is important to note that throughout Iran, it is illegal for foreigners to either buy organs or sell organs to Iranian citizens.

Announcing TEDMED 2015

We’re thrilled to share some exciting news with you: the venue, dates and theme for TEDMED 2015.

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This year’s event will focus on Break<ing>Through the status quo and celebrating the typical, the atypical and the spaces in between as we come together to shape a healthier world.

The mythology of a “breakthrough” tells the story of a lone genius and one magical, “aha” moment. But, let’s not mistake a good story for the truth. In reality, we all have breakthrough potential and the least likely way to unlock that potential is to toil away in social or intellectual solitude. Instead, we break through in new combinations and we collect the building blocks of our future breakthroughs every day, in every new interaction, in every new insight, one improvement at a time.

This year we’ll explore…

  • breaking through the silos that prevent different disciplines from sharing problems and insights;

  • breaking through glass ceilings and closed doors that hold back some women and minorities from entering medical research;

  • breaking through national and cultural boundaries;

And, breaking through old assumptions to explore new science and new visions of what’s possible – in ourselves, in our work and in the world at large.

We invite you to join us and secure your spot at TEDMED 2015 today.

Our home in 2015: Palm Springs, California, November 18-20

The venue this year in sunny Palm Springs, California inspires a new vibe that we hope you are as excited about as we are. A more collaborative setting and design will help speakers, delegates and innovators come together and explore the important topics and themes the stage program brings forward in a more connected way than ever before.

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Of course, our gathering will include the brilliant talks you’ve come to know from some of the most inspiring change-makers both inside and outside of health and medicine, as well as stunning artistic performances and transformative innovators. Our recently formed Editorial Advisory Board – made up of rock star movers and shakers hailing from health and medicine as well as the worlds of business and technology, foundations and academia, philanthropy and design, and journalism and communications – is hard at work helping us shape a diverse and inspiring stage program.

Connecting across the world: TEDMED Live

As always, a vital part of our mission is to ensure that all stage content is accessible to the broadest community possible. Through TEDMED Live our content is free for teaching hospitals, medical schools, non-profits and government agencies around the world, building on last year’s participation of 200,000 remote participants in 140+ countries.

We invite you to join us in Palm Springs this November – visit www.tedmed.com for more information, or click here today.

A week of health and medicine #news from @TEDMED

These are the stories that we shared with the TEDMED community this week – read them again or if you missed them, you’re in luck! Follow us on Twitter to get daily updates.

@TEDMED

Could this gaming platform based on tech from the Gazzaley lab become first FDA-approved video game?

TEDMED 2014 speaker and filmmaker Tiffany Shlain talks about how we can unlock the unique potential of the human brain

TEDMED 2014 speaker Josh Stein uses smart med devices to positively influence patient behavior

New paper on ways to address adverse childhood experiences

More on how TEDMED 2014 speaker Marc Koska is helping save lives around the world w/his single use syringe

#GreatChallenges

Tailored safety-net programs to minimize institutionalizing patients with mental illness

“Basket studies:” a “new breed” of studies are providing a faster way to try drugs on many cancers

“Exploring the supposed contradiction between America’s healthcare costs & and its health outcomes” 

Teens eat better when the motivation is tied to something they’re passionate about 

Idea that kids should eat “bland, sweet food” is an “industrial presumption” 

“12 companies leading the way in digital health”

Bionic reconstruction allows the mind to control a hand after amputation

Wathc the recast of the GreatChallenges G+ Hangout event on patient experience

The CDC says we could cut the HIV transmission rate by more than 90%

Using training and technology to avoid nurse injuries at the VA

Enhancing the role of the patient in the drug review process, with Congress?

“Plain Cigarette Packs May Deter Smokers, Studies Show”

Should generic drug makers update medicine labels when they learn of safety risks?

Add your voice to the Beryl Institute’s global conversation about the state of the patient experience

Mindfulness training on your smartphone

“CHIP reauthorization is…a harbinger of things to come with future ACA battles”

“Federal study: Foster kids struggle to get health screenings”

What could the Supreme Court challenge mean for the Affordable Care Act?

Recast of the discussion from Robert Wood Johnson Foundation on how we can help all kids grow up at a healthy weight

How social media is changing suicide prevention

Reducing air pollution improves children’s lung health during a critical time

Study highlights importance of exercise, even for those w/identical genes & nurturing 

Measuring the Value of Patient-Centered Care: Last Week’s Hangout Participants Address Unanswered Questions

Is it possible to measure the value of patient-centered care? Last week, as part of TEDMED’s Great Challenges Program, a multi-disciplinary group of experts moderated by Boston NPR Health Care Reporter Martha Bebinger, discussed the rise of patient-centered care, explored how we can standardize its measurement to encourage evidence-based policy changes, and touched on what those potential policy changes might look like.

If you weren’t able to join us, check out the recast here:

Thanks again for taking to social media to submit your questions and comments! We had such wonderful questions that an hour left us short on time to address them all. So, we asked a few of our panelists, Steven Horowitz, Alyssa Wostrel and Alex Drane, to offer their perspectives on several remaining questions. Read on for their thoughts:

What are the pros and/or cons of relying on patient or healthcare provider self-reporting of patient-centered care?

Steven: The patient’s assessment of pain and suffering is the gold standard for this measurement. This may be influenced by behavioral problems, addiction or mental illness. How many patients have these problems may vary significantly from community to community, thus survey results may be difficult to compare between geographical regions. In terms of the healthcare provider assessing his or her own performance, I’m reminded of one comedian’s line: “85% of car drivers consider themselves above average.” Many surveys show discordance between what healthcare providers consider important and what patients and families consider important. That does not mean the opinion of the healthcare provider is not helpful. However, the experience of the patient essentially defines the concept of patient-centered care.

If we encourage heavy focus on data (such as survey results), should we be concerned that it may take the attention off of actual patient care? Is there a chance that meeting the specific numbers might not equate to care that is focused on the patient?

Steven: Good question! Surveys and other assessment tools are critically important to generate the data we need for continuous quality improvement. This data keeps us on target for addressing the needs of the patients, however, when these results are blindly tied to pay and promotions there is great potential healthcare providers may inordinately focus on survey results to the exclusion of other important considerations.

Alex: It depends on what you are surveying! Historically, the industry has focused on measuring things that are clinical in nature – these are important indicators of overall health, but may themselves be just markers of other issues. For example, maybe my blood pressure is high because I hate my boss and dealing with him makes my heart race. You can tell me to work on managing my blood pressure or eating better, but if you don’t know why those things are happening, you’re squeezing a water balloon. If, on the other hand, you were asking me about my workplace stress and I told you it was high, then you could provide me with some resources to help, and we could begin to track how well they were working against, let’s say, a goal of a 30% improvement. If workplace stress is what’s making me unhealthy, then reducing my workplace stress by 30% would equate to care that is very much focused on me. We all know the old adage “you can’t manage what you can’t measure” – we need to measure the things that matter so we can manage them. 

If we achieve a standardized measurement system for patient-centered care, do you see a place for rewarding healthcare providers who consistently deliver this type of care? If so, how might that work?

Steven: Healthcare providers, or better, teams of healthcare providers, should be rewarded for consistently outstanding results in patient-centered care. The difficulty remains, however, that high achievers may represent healthcare providers adept at gaming the system or, more hopefully, healthcare providers who have created an outstanding culture of patient-centered care that any assessment would identify. 

What steps can patients take to ensure the care they receive is tailored to them?

Steven: Patients need to ask critical questions, speak to current patients if they are allowed to, review standard healthcare and physician grading systems to identify flaws, and most importantly, avail themselves of the many electronic resources available about how to become a successful and informed patient.

Alex: This is one of the easiest, and hardest, questions in all of health care. The concept of what we can do is enormously straightforward: become empowered, get informed, stand up for what we care about, demand care that is commensurate with our values and beliefs. But oh boy, that can be hard to do. I’m the queen of walking into a doctor’s office ready to demand this and that – only to slouch out, tail between my legs, with none of my original goals shared, acknowledged, let alone addressed. Whose fault is that? On some level, it’s mine. Slowly, with time, with sharing enabled by new technologies, with shifting demographics and new “norms,” we will rise up and demand to be equal participants in our own care – and we will be happier, healthier, and all the more productive (providers, too!). A great low-hanging fruit as we transition from one end of the spectrum to the other is to become an advocate for someone else’s health – bit by bit, if we all commit to do this for each other, we’ll help speed the arrival of a new normal where collaborative, empathetic, holistic care is rarely the exception.

Some argue that medical care is meant to cure – not to cater to patients. What would you say to those who purport that sometimes, the patient isn’t right and needs to be sternly told what to do? 

Steven: In conversations with patients I try to be as supportive and understanding of their concerns as possible, but I’m very clear about my own interpretation of the literature and what I think is in the best interest of the patient. At times I will tell a patient that we are dealing with two separate issues that are interrelated: the healthcare condition that needs treatment and the the underlying fear that may cause denial. It’s at these moments when I express my concern that the emotional component may interfere with the patient choosing the best medical option.

Alyssa: This question suggests a controlling and patronizing role may be successful and necessary in reaching the “cure.” One of the key problems with this approach is that it denies the patient involvement in and accountability for their own health and well-being.

Alex: We’ve all read the literature showing the more collaborative and shared the decision-making is, the better the outcomes. There is also increasing evidence that outcomes in situations where a provider shows empathy trump those where they do not. The days of old-fashioned paternalistic care are coming to an end…all hail the new day!  Look at the extraordinary success of efforts like “Open Notes” at Beth Israel – “Nothing about me without me.” Now – is it true that there might be some souls who, when asked, request an extremely militaristic approach to care delivery? Sure! But then it would be their choice.

What is the best solution for keeping patients engaged and involved? 

Steven: It is important to be respectful and empathic and meet the patient where he or she is now. Encouragement and praise for the patient starting to take responsibility for understanding their condition and becoming proactive is often a turning point in their care.

Alex: If I’m pretty sure my husband is cheating on me and I just got fired…do I really have the capacity to focus on my diabetes? We need to expand the definition of health to include life – because when life goes wrong, health goes wrong. Not only do life challenges sap our capacity to care for ourselves in traditional ways (eating well, taking our meds, exercising, sleeping, taking care of our preventive screenings…) – they actually make us sick as well. Solve the problems real people want solved, redefine “vital signs” to include what is most vital. Meet us in the messy realities of our lives, where we live, work, and play (or pray!) – and not only will we engage, we’ll finally be enabled to make real change to our health. I recently had the great fortune to work with RWJF on their Pioneering Ideas effort, and through that was introduced to the work of Sendhil Mullainathan out of Harvard. Sendhil talks about the difference between something being important and something being urgent. Going to the gym is important – making sure your marriage isn’t collapsing is urgent. Given his additional assertion that time and attention are scarce commodities – how do we incorporate the reality of “attentional real estate” in our attempts to foundationally impact health?  He’s building some super sexy tools to help – so listen here when you get a chance: RWJF’s Pioneering Ideas podcast.

How do we involve patients in crafting policy changes for patient-centered care?

Alyssa: Including patients on hospital and community health center boards and committees to hear their feedback and to involve them in finding and implementing solutions has gotten excellent results.

Dr. Selby observed that measuring patient experience is difficult to do via objective measures (which I think is true). Yet clinicians often show reluctance to embrace subjective assessments. What can be done to change this culture? 

Steven: This is also an excellent question! There are several ways this can change. One is the continued tying together of surveys with critical outcomes. This may include freedom from suffering, duration of illness, complications of treatment and longevity. The ones that I feel strongly about, for which we have barely put a toe in the water, include objective laboratory assessments of inflammatory markers and gene expression. Although “hard” measurements, they may be influenced by “soft” intervention such as meditation, empathy, exercise, diet and sleep.

Unlocking Human Potential: Q&A with Tiffany Shlain

Speaking during TEDMED 2014’s “Human Nature Inside and Out” session, filmmaker Tiffany Shlain captivated her audience with a personal and insightful talk about the unique strengths of the human brain and how we can unlock our potential. We reached out to her for more insights from her talk topic.

Tiffany Shlain on the TEDMED stage [Jerod Harris].

Tiffany Shlain on the TEDMED stage [Photo: Jerod Harris, TEDMED 2014].

 

What motivated you to speak at TEDMED?

I love the mash-up of scientists and artists coming together. Combining art and science is at the root of all of my films, talks, creativity and my upbringing.

Why does your talk matter now?

These days, there is a great deal of conversation about how technology can impact humans. These conversations tend to either be based on fear and anxiety, or are overly idealistic. Meanwhile, there are also conversations taking place about revamping the education system, and focusing on the sciences and engineering. The problem is that I haven’t seen those conversations overlap yet. I want to emphasize what they point to the potential of humanity. Our focus should be on the strengths that are unique to humans, and how we can work in concert with the things we can program machines to do, in order to flourish in the 21st century. This is the conversation we need to be having.

If you had more time on the TEDMED stage, what else would you have talked about?

My talk was the basis of a new film my team is in the process of finishing, called “The Adaptable Mind.” That film will then be the beginning of a longer project we’ll be working on over the next few years. People are ready for this conversation, and I’m excited to dive deeper into it.

Are there any action items you want your viewers to take?

I hope people will practice the human strengths I discuss – metacognition, empathy, creativity, and initiative – and begin working them into their daily lives.

What is the legacy you want to leave?

Through my talks and films, I hope to inspire people to ask questions, laugh, and think deeply about what it means to be human in our ever-changing world.