Lisa Nilsson’s unforgettable slice of life

Lisa Nilsson at TEDMED 2012

Imagine what a cross-section of your chest might look like – rendered in the densely coiled whorls of colored paper used in the Medieval art of quilling. Lisa Nilsson’s art is mesmerizing.  Below, her latest work – a male pelvis.

The Male Pelvis. Courtesy of Lisa Nilsson

Frances Arnold on bioengineering our medical future

Frances Arnold at TEDMED 2012

Natural selection has endowed species with unique gifts that we can now access and share — it’s just a matter of finding the right combination of protein DNA. Frances Arnold directs molecular evolution in a quest to devise completely new treatments for some of humanity’s most vexing problems.

Reisa Sperling: How soon can we predict Alzheimer’s?

Can advances in brain scans and other testing techniques help us predict who will come down with Alzheimer’s — decades before symptoms show?  Reisa Sperling of Brigham and Women’s Hospital reports on the latest research in battling a disease whose symptoms show up far too late to cure.

Reisa Sperling at TEDMED 2012

Sperling’s work in the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer’s Network (DIAN) study was published July 11th in the New England Journal of Medicine. In this work, a team of researchers offered a timeline of the disease progression, with biomarkers, including changes in brain size and spinal fluid, evident as early as 25 years before the onset of symptoms. Read more about it here.

 

 

Ivan Oransky talks to Medgadget: Are we over-medicalized?

Ivan Oransky, M.D. and Executive Editor of Reuters Health, made waves with his TEDMED 2012 talk on the vast amounts of time and money spent on “pre-conditions” — pre-cancer, pre-diabetes, even pre-acne.  Today, Medgadget continues the discussion with Ivan, in which he fields questions about post-talk coverage, the importance of casting a critical eye on research evidence, and whether consumer-based health monitoring devices actually work.

Watch Ivan’s talk at TEDMED 2012:

Ivan Oransky at TEDMED 2012