TEDMED Partner spaces: Saddle up to the Inspiration Bar, experience schizophrenia and try Touchless Technology

The Social Hub was abuzz today with good conversation, good food and great opportunities to interact with innovative experiences, technologies and thought leaders in the partner and contributor social spaces.

Healthcare today is unsustainable — but we can change that, according to Siemens Healthcare, a trendsetter in medical imaging, laboratory diagnostics and health IT. Escalating costs, the growing burden of chronic disease and an aging population explosion all conspire to create an untenable healthcare landscape. What’s the solution? It lies at the intersection of higher quality and lower cost.

In the Siemens space, Delegates guessed at where the United States and other countries land along the cost-quality curve — at a surprising disadvantage, as it turns out. Innovation and new technologies, like advanced imagery that allows for more personalized, less wasteful medicine could move the system in the right direction, said Donald Rucker, MD, Vice President and Chief Medical Officer of Siemens Medical Solutions. Siemens also showcased “touchless interaction,” a tool surgeons can use to navigate their way through less-invasive but complicated surgery on a video screen that can be manipulated with the swipe of a hand from across the room, using the Kinect sensor currently used on X-boxes.

Johnson & Johnson (J&J) has a 125-year history of improving health through innovation — from band-aids to creating sterile environments for surgery. They’re here at TEDMED for the innovation, collaboration and “diversity of thinking, which has been a part of Johnson & Johnson’s culture for a long time,” said Michael Sneed, Vice President of Global Corporate Affairs. “People come here with their minds open. They’re not shy about coming up and talking to us.”

The J&J space at TEDMED is about more than just talk, though. We tried out some immersive experiences designed to help truly understand what patients are going through. It may not be pervasive in medical school curricula (yet), but empathy is a critical skill in health and health care. Among the exhibits:

  • A 3-D, immersive program that lets you experience what it’s like to live with schizophrenia. The experience is rattling, and really comes to life with smells of rotten coffee, a simulation of wind on your face and disturbing hallucinations. The program is deployed in mobile units to providers and emergency first responders who support patients in crisis, to help them understand and better counsel these patients.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis gloves, which simulate hand movement constrained by the stresses and limitations of severe rheumatoid arthritis. With the gloves on, try opening a jar or opening a ziploc bag — both everyday, but near impossible tasks with the gloves. These are intended help providers and those who design products better understand how rheumatic arthritis patients can handle necessities like pill bottles.

The Inspiration Bar offered fascinating discussion with Cleveland Clinic innovators, physicians and researchers. Topics this week include the healing impact of art and music, myths and facts about chocolate and red wine (sign us up!), an interactive session on “Wellness Coaching” from Chief Wellness Officer Dr. Michael Roizen, and the truth about diets.

At today’s talk on lessons learned from treating some of the greatest athletes in the world, led by Dr. Thomas Graham, Vice Chair of Orthopedic Surgery, we learned that perhaps the ultimate American innovator developed a novel process in 1968. In the first year, he achieved 75% adoption of his method, and that climbed to 100% at the four-year mark.

Was he a top researcher? Nope. Dr. Graham was referring to Dick Fosbury, the Olympic track and field athlete who was the first to try the high jump “back-first,” now known as the Fosbury Flop. “He thought completely differently, and it resulted in a sea change,” said Dr. Graham. That’s what we need to do in health care, he said. “Medicine cannot be stagnant. We need to be always looking for big ideas.”

The Cleveland Clinic also offered a “Walk With a Doc” program throughout TEDMED, an idea gaining national traction among medical centers. The program allows patients to get their health questions answered while getting some physical activity under their belts in a roving, group doctor’s visit.

Comments

This comment will be attributed to