Examined Lives: The tale of the bungled biopsy

By Margaret Brunner*

In December, I went to Starsen Radiology* for my annual mammogram. They called me at the end of the month. They said I needed to come back immediately for another mammogram because they had found a suspicious mass in my right breast. So I went in that day for another mammo. They definitely saw something, and said I needed to get a biopsy done ASAP, and could perform it, f I wanted.

Of course, I panicked.  I called my Ob-Gyn to see what she had to say. The Gyn office said that Starsen* did biopsies all the time, and that it would be okay to schedule it with them. I called and set the appointment for January 7th. I’ll never forget the date.

The big day arrived and I went to Starsen for the biopsy.  I was nervous as heck. I’d never had this done before, so I didn’t know what to expect.  There were two nurses there to help me prep. Then the doctor came in to explain the procedure and had me sign a paper, of course.

The procedure, called stereotactic biopsy, was pretty painful – they said there would be “some discomfort.” They gave me a local anesthetic, but it was never enough.  Boy, was I glad when it was over.  They told me that they would send the tissue sample to the pathology department in a local hospital and that it would take about one to two days to get the results back.

The waiting was the worst part.  You start to think about horrible possibilities.  Starsen never gave me an idea of how many biopsies show a malignancy, though I did find out from another breast center that 80% turn out to be benign. I’ve been relatively healthy all my life.  So, when I got the call that I would need a biopsy, I was very worried. I kept on thinking, “What if do have breast cancer?  How am I going to tell my kids? I haven’t done so many things that I still would like to do.”

This then led me to develop hives, which happens when I’m psychologically stressed.  On day two, I called Starsen to see if they had the pathology report. Nothing yet.  Day three, still nothing.  Day four, nothing.  Day five, nothing.  Imagine my fears growing and my hives getting worse.  Day six: Starsen had finally gotten the pathology report back. It was benign!  Hallelujah!  I was so happy.

Fast forward to a week later. I get a call from Starsen, who tell me that they took a sample of the wrong area.  Are you kidding?? I couldn’t believe it.  When they mentioned risks before the procedure, they mentioned infection. They did say they might not get the right sample, but that it was very unlikely. Not only did I have to endure the pain of the procedure and many days of waiting for the pathology report, I now found out that they got the wrong area. I never found out why, and another radiologist told me the news – not the one who had done the procedure. They tried to make me go to them for another biopsy.  I declined.  I didn’t pay anything for that procedure out of my pocket – I guess insurance picked up the tab.

I wasn’t sure what I should do.  Should I see a surgeon?  I got a few names in my area. Then I talked to someone in my town and found out about a breast surgeon in Manhattan. Apparently, many women in this area have gone to see her and she is well regarded in the field. I wanted to see someone who really knew about breast issues.  I finally got to see her on February 6th.  Because the mass was so far back in the breast, she recommended another stereotactic biopsy, instead of surgically getting a sample of the suspicious mass.  But she said she wanted the radiologists at her location do the biopsy. That was fine with me.  I loved the breast surgeon.  She was a kind doctor.

On February 12th, I went in for my biopsy.  What a different experience.  There were two nurses there for my procedure, but they really “held my hand” to tell me what was going on and what they needed to do during the procedure.  I really liked that aspect.  I also got to meet the two radiologists who were working on my case.  They introduced themselves to me beforehand and told me what to expect during the procedure.  And they gave me their phone number in case I had questions.

After the procedure, the radiologist got another image to make sure they got the right area. The radiologist in New Jersey hadn’t bothered with that.  I loved the radiologist who performed the biopsy.  She kept asking how I was feeling. Although she gave me a lot of lidocaine, I still felt quite a painful tug and pull during the process.

They sent the sample to their pathology group and said to expect the report within 24-48 hours.  After my last experience, I was very skeptical about getting it that soon.  I was ready to wait six days again.  But boy, was I wrong.  The pathology report came back incredibly quickly – 24 hours!  And happily, it was benign!

If I had to do it over again, I would have found a doctor that other women have seen and speak highly of.  I would asked my friends right away to see if they knew of a good doctor.  Telling my friends also helped relieve the stress of worrying about whether I had cancer. My friends are truly one my pillars of strength.

*Names have been changed to protect privacy.

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