Healthcare Accessibility: A Look At The Numbers

At TEDMED this year, we will hear from three Speakers and Innovators who approach health care through the lens of economics. Through their work, we will explore different ways to think about allocating our finite resources in a world of limitless possibilities.

A natural experiment is an observational study that allows for the random—or seemingly random—assignment of study subjects to different groups. These kinds of experiments are rare but important when studying ideas that are impossible or unethical to recreate in the setting of a controlled experiment. Former Emergency Department social worker-turned-Medicaid researcher Heidi Allen seized the opportunity to study one such organic experiment in 2008, when the state of Oregon decided to expand its Medicaid program. There were 90,000 people who signed up for the expanded program, but as a result of limited funding, only 10,000 people were chosen to participate by random lottery. This unique circumstance provided Heidi and her team of researchers a randomized controlled trial with which to study the effects of Medicaid coverage.

The experiment’s results were complicated in terms of their impact on the newly-covered patients. Some outcomes were clearly positive—such as patients experiencing declining rates of clinical depression and financial stress as their medical debts decreased. Other results were less desirable. For instance, data indicated that the newly covered patients’ physical health markers—such as blood pressure, cholesterol, and cardiovascular disease—did not significantly improve. Along with these results, valuable lessons were learned. Heidi’s landmark research helped uncover truths about the role that health insurance plays in the lives of low-income Americans with limited access to coverage.

Even for people with health insurance, trying to understand or predict the costs that will accompany health care can become overwhelming. Often, it’s impossible to ascertain the cost of medical procedures in advance, and it’s not unusual for surprise bills to arrive months after your appointment. Eligible co-founder and CEO Katelyn Gleason wants to take the mystery out of medical billing. By integrating with existing medical systems, Eligible offers patients up-front information on the price of their procedures and co-pays, allowing them to pay at the time of service instead of waiting for months to receive a bill. Eligible not only benefits patients, but also physicians—who are saving valuable time not having to track down patients’ payments, helping them to collect up to 700% more revenue at the time of service.

While Katelyn is helping patients and providers demystify health care billing, health policy expert Amitabh Chandra is focusing on the important role that precision medicine will play in the future of drug pricing. Amitabh encourages us to consider the economic choices necessary to fund the next generation of medicine, in which the creation of targeted therapies that apply to smaller groups of people will change the economics of pharmaceuticals as we know it.

Funding and research in precision medicine are booming and for good reason: this approach hopes to maximize efficiency when treating disease. Currently, the Orphan Drug Act and other FDA regulatory incentives provide economic impetus for pharmaceutical companies to pursue precision medicine research. Yet it’s important to recognize that smaller markets, less competition, high technological manufacturing costs, and increased effectiveness could all result in eventual rising drug prices. Amitabh explores how we can incentivize companies to continue making precision therapeutics that patients can actually afford.

We are excited to hear more from each of these TEDMED Speakers and Innovators about their work investigating ways we can maximize our resources in economically sustainable ways. Join us at TEDMED this year to get to know them and their work better.