What is Culinary Medicine? Q&A with John La Puma

Nutrition specialist, chef, author, and practicing physician John La Puma lives and works on an organic farm in California. He makes his garbanzo guacamole recipe on the TEDMED stage while sharing his philosophy that the food we eat is as important as the pills we take, a key component of preventive health and our well being.  On the TEDMED Blog, John elaborates on culinary medicine and what role patients may have taking charge of their health and even educating their physicians about how to consider nutrition as part of the treatment plan.

John La Puma on culinary medicine

“Food is the most important healthcare intervention we have against chronic disease.” John La Puma, TEDMED 2014. Photo: Jerod Harris for TEDMED.

Why does this talk matter now?

Patients who ask their doctors, “What should I eat for my condition?” really want answers. Meanwhile, clinicians are clamoring for more and better information and training on nutrition. Culinary medicine is a new evidence-based field in medicine that blends the art of food and cooking with the science of medicine to yield high-quality meals and beverages which aim to improve the patient’s condition. It is already being taught in both undergraduate and postgraduate medical education.

What impact do you hope the talk will have?

I hope that the talk will help accelerate the cultural shift in healthcare towards wellness and well-being as primary goals in medicine. People need to know that some physicians care deeply about helping them become well with what they eat.

What is the legacy you want to leave?

Our mission is to inspire health-conscious consumers to look, feel and actually be measurably healthier by what they eat. The opportunity to use culinary medicine to prevent and treat disease is substantial, and culinary medicine should be considered as part of both the medical history and treatment plan in medicine.

How would medicine change if your ideas become reality?

All clinicians should be able to write culinary medicine prescriptions and know how food, like medicine, works in the body. I’d like to see condition-specific food and lifestyle measures become something that clinicians can offer, effectively, before prescription medication for most chronic conditions.

What is your core belief about culinary medicine?

Everyone has a right to clean, healthful, delicious, real food that both satisfies their appetite and makes or keeps them well…before it may be too late to offer more than comfort food.

Please share anything else you wish you could have included in your talk.

70% of heart disease, stroke, diabetes, memory loss, premature wrinkling and impotence are preventable. 80% of cancers and much of asthma and lung disease are preventable, and from environmental causes, like toxin exposure or diet.*  Knowing more about what’s in your food and how it got there can help you take your own health into your own hands, save you money and provide joy and energy for those you love. With culinary medicine, health-conscious people can live life to its youngest.

Ask your doctor, “What do I eat for my condition?”  If he or she doesn’t know, do your own research- here’s my list of resources.

Now it’s time to try John’s Luscious & Rich Garbanzo Guacamole recipe!

1 ripe medium avocado, preferably Haas

1 medium clove of garlic, peeled, diced and creamed with lime zest

1 medium serrano chile pepper, stemmed and diced, but not seeded

1/4 teaspoon minced lime zest, preferably organic

2 tablespoons fresh lime juice (about 1 medium lime)

1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil, COOC preferred

1/2 cup cooked chickpeas, rinsed and drained

1/2 teaspoon yellow curry powder, such as Madras curry

1/4 teaspoon black pepper

5 sturdy springs cilantro or Italian flat leaf parsley (optional)

Cut the avocado in half long-wise around the pit and separate the halves. Remove the pit.

Use a spoon to scoop around the flesh and remove it in one piece.

Place upside down on a cutting board, dice into large chunks. Scoop up and place in a large stainless steel bowl.

Add the garlic, chile, zest, juice and oil, and mix by hand with a fork or a tablespoon.

Smash the chickpeas with the flat side of a chef’s knife, to break the skin. Sprinkle the curry and black pepper on the garbanzos, add to the bowl, mix again, and top with herb garnish if desired.

Serve with corn tortillas or toasted chips, sliced jicama triangles and sliced cucumber circles. Enjoy!

Nutritional Data Per Serving (3 servings):193 calories, 17 g carbs, 14 g fat, 3 g protein, 125 mg sodium, 7 gram fiber.

Adapted from La Puma J. “ChefMD’s Big Book of Culinary Medicine”, Crown, 2008.

(c) John La Puma, MD, Santa Barbara, CA, 10.2013

*See John’s TEDMED bio page for references and resources that support these claims.

Lab Testing Reinvented: Q&A with Elizabeth Holmes of Theranos

The United States spends more on healthcare than any other Western nation – more than two and a half times the amount spent by most developed countries. Even so, most Americans do not have access to quality, timely care. Patients seeking care face unpredictable costs for even the most routine diagnostic procedures, like blood testing.

These hurdles are so prohibitive that seeking out healthcare is often viewed as a last resort – an option to be considered only when symptoms appear. In some cases, this can be too late. Elizabeth Holmes reminds us that access to affordable, preventive care is a human right. It is this right – the right to be as healthy as possible – that is at the root of her mission to make actionable health information accessible to everyone at the time it matters.

At TEDMED 2014, Elizabeth talked about this right and the importance of enabling early detection and empowering individuals to make educated decisions about their healthcare.

Elizabeth Holmes, TEDMED2014. Photo, Jerod Harris, TEDMED.

Elizabeth Holmes, TEDMED2014. Photo, Jerod Harris, TEDMED.

We reached out to her with a couple of follow up questions about her work and her company, Theranos.

Why does this talk matter now? What impact do you hope the talk will have?

We believe the right to protect the health and wellbeing of every person – of those we love – is a basic human right. Yet, in the United States today, healthcare is the leading cause of bankruptcy. Similarly, lack of healthcare is the leading cause of the suffering associated with finding out too late in the disease progression process that someone you love is really, really sick. We believe that every individual has a right to accurate, affordable, real-time health information before people become so sick that it is too late to change outcomes.

What is the legacy you want to leave?

Our mission at Theranos is to make actionable information accessible to everyone at the time it matters most. Theranos is a new paradigm of diagnosis, in which every person will be able to see the onset of disease in time for therapy to be effective. Through it, we see a world in which no one ever has to say “goodbye” too soon, and people are able to leverage engagement with their health to live their best lives.

“Everyone has the right to a standard of living adequate for the health and well-being of himself and of his family, including food, clothing, housing and medical care and necessary social services, and the right to security in the event of unemployment, sickness, disability, widowhood, old age or other lack of livelihood in circumstances beyond his control.” –The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Article 25, Point 1.