A prescription for… art?

It’s safe to say that, when we think about personalized medicine, one of the last things that comes to mind is music. But, should it? These days, music streaming apps aren’t only organized by genre; you can easily find curated playlists that are designed to put you in a certain mood, or help you reach a goal (how about some “Cure those Monday morning blues” or “Songs to wake up happy,” anyone?). Many of us regularly use music as a tool to help us focus on the task at hand, or to pump ourselves up before a challenging workout.

Image courtesy of ShutterstockThere’s nothing particularly surprising about the fact that music affects how we feel. But, do we really understand what it does to our brains and bodies? The physiological and neurological effects of music are largely a mystery – one that Ketki Karanam, Head of Science at The Sync Project, is eager to solve. The Sync Project – whose Advisory board members include artists like Peter Gabriel, as well as neuroscientists and machine learning experts – is designing the first large scale data collection and machine learning models to understand these effects. It will identify how music’s structural properties – like beat and tempo – can affect our biometric rhythms, such as heart rate, sleep patterns, and brain activity.

The goal of the initiative? To identify potential music therapeutics that would serve as an alternative to drugs for health issues like insomnia, pain, and anxiety. Like Ketki, the relationship between music and medicine has also been a lifelong interest for Richard Kogan, who has led a distinguished career as both a psychiatrist and a concert pianist. A professor at the Weill Cornell Medical College, Richard has developed a series of renowned lecture-recitals, in which he examines the influence of psychological and psychiatric factors on the creative work of great composers, like Schumann, Beethoven, Tchaikovsky, and Gershwin. In part, Richard is motivated by a desire to destigmatize mental illness by highlighting savants with mental disorders, whose symptoms may have inspired their creative processes.

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Scarred for Life, Ted Meyer

For both Ketki and Richard, music and medicine are inseparable. But does the relationship between the two extend beyond music, to other forms of art? According to artist and curator Ted Meyer, it does. Having been diagnosed with Gaucher disease, a rare genetic illness, at age 6, Ted spent years in hospital rooms creating paintings that depicted the loneliness, fatigue, and pain he experienced. Decades later, after a new drug was discovered to treat those symptoms, the subject of Ted’s art has changed. Today, his 18 year old project, “Scarred for Life,” chronicles the trauma and courage of people who have lived through accidents and health crises. Using this mixture of personal stories and a love for art, Ted has set out to improve the doctor-patient relationship. As an Artist in Residence at the USC Keck School of Medicine, Ted curates patient-artists whose work ties to the medical curriculum; for example, an artist with asthma for a class on the respiratory system. Ted hopes to expand this program to other medical schools, with a goal of teaching future doctors to look at their patients beyond their diagnoses, and view them as complex, whole human beings.

We are delighted that Ketki, Richard, and Ted will each be speaking on the TEDMED 2016 stage, where they will share their discoveries and unique insights about the relationship between art and medicine. We invite you to join us this November 30-December 2, in Palm Springs, CA, to learn more from them and other extraordinary speakers.

Healing ourselves, and healing our world

Many of us have heard the adage, “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.” At TEDMED, we embrace this philosophy; every year, we convene extraordinary people and ideas from across different disciplines who are all united in shaping a healthier future for our planet and its 7 billion people. And, at TEDMED 2016, we are honored to feature such committed, passionate citizens in our program.

One such actor is TEDMED Hive Innovator and EpiBiome CEO, Nick Conley. According to Nick, he founded EpiBiome in response to multi-drug-resistant “superbugs” that threaten to reverse the last one-hundred years of surgical advances if new antibiotics are not discovered, due to the risk of post-operative infection that is too high to justify all but the most necessary surgical procedures. In search for a substitute for antibiotic treatment, EpiBiome has taken to the sewer to explore bacteriophages – viruses that infect and destroy specific bacteria ­– as a natural and effective alternative. According to Nick, phages outnumber bacteria 10:1 and kill half the bacteria on the planet every two days. Importantly, some phages have already received “Generally Recognized as Safe” status from the FDA for use on food intended for human consumption.

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Image provided by Kinnos.

Meanwhile, TEDMED Hive Innovator Kevin Tyan, along with his co-founders at Kinnos, has taken a different approach to fighting infection. Recognizing the urgent need to improve decontamination in response to the Ebola epidemic, Kevin and his co-founders realized that regular bleach disinfectant wasn’t enough to protect health workers. Although bleach has been recommended by the World Health Organization as the best and most cost efficient disinfectant for surfaces contaminated by infectious disease, its effectiveness is limited by its transparency and the fact that it’s easy to miss spots and leave gaps in coverage. It also bounces off waterproof surfaces, much like rain bounces off an umbrella.

For Kevin, this was a challenge begging to be tackled head on. He and his co-founders created Highlight ­– a patent-pending powdered additive that colorizes disinfectants. This makes it easier to visualize, ensure full coverage, and adhere to surfaces. The color is only temporary, however, and fades once decontamination is complete.

Another TEDMED speaker who is not only deeply committed to protecting our health, but also that of our planet, is Gunhild Stordalen, Founder and President of the EAT Foundation. Gunhild believes that many of our major global health and environmental challenges are inextricably linked to food: what we eat, how our food is produced, and all that is wasted. With the knowledge that there is no single solution to this problem, the EAT Foundation works toward stimulating interdisciplinary research and catalyzing action across sectors to enable us to feed a growing global population with healthy food, from a healthy planet.

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Image provided by Caitlin Doughty.

Mortician and TEDMED speaker Caitlin Doughty is also deeply concerned about the health of our planet – particularly, the environmental risks of current burial practices. According to the Funeral Consumers Alliance of Southern California, traditional burials – where an embalmed body in a wooden coffin is sometimes placed in a concrete or metal vault ­– require more than 30 million board feet of hardwood, 90,000 tons of steel, 1.6 million tons of concrete and over 800,000 gallons of carcinogenic formaldehyde embalming fluid every year. Caitlin’s proposed solution? Eco-friendly death and burial practices, such as water cremation and natural composting. To that end, in 2012, Caitlin founded Undertaking LA, a progressive funeral home that provides alternative, green burial options.

Though they are taking wildly different approaches, these speakers and innovators are committed to a common goal – healing our world. We are inspired by their work, and are excited to see them speak at TEDMED 2016. We hope you’ll join us there.

Announcing TEDMED 2016 Speakers: Endgame?

What if we possess the knowledge to be the architects of our aging and eventual deaths?

As children, most of us counted down to our birthdays, eagerly anticipating the milestones that came with each new age. At some point in life, nostalgia for the past begins to replace our excitement for the future. Many of us are filled with fear and dread at the thought of aging into the unknown. What if we changed this narrative, embraced our childlike wonder, and revitalized our excitement for what lies ahead?

In a session called “Endgame?”, speakers from different walks of life will share personal discoveries and revelations that have shaped their lives. This session will challenge our personal and cultural perceptions of longevity, quality of life, caregiving, and death. Our insightful speakers include:


Caitlin Doughty
Progressive Mortician

Caitlin asks: What if we re-designed the funeral industry for an eco-friendly end of life?

With a proclivity for the macabre from an early age, atypical mortician Caitlin Doughty began her career in the funeral industry as a crematory operator. Currently a licensed funeral director and eco-friendly mortician in Los Angeles, Caitlin empower families to care for their dead and unites communities to prepare a death phobic culture for their inevitable mortality. Read More…


Cheryl Steed
Prison Psychologist

Cheryl asks: What if criminals could transform their identities after learning to become caregivers and patient advocates?

Clinical psychologist Cheryl Steed leads one of the Gold Coat Programs at the California Men’s Colony (CMC), a medium-security prison in central California. Through the program, Cheryl trains a select group of inmates–“Gold Coats”–to become caregivers to elderly or severely cognitively impaired inmates, including those with dementia. Read More…


Lucy Kalanithi
Caregiver

Lucy asks: What if we experienced death the way doctors do?

Stanford internist Lucy Kalanithi is the widow of neurosurgeon and writer Paul Kalanithi, who details his battle with Stage IV lung cancer at age 36 in his memoir When Breath Becomes Air. As a caregiver for her husband during all phases of his illness into his death, Lucy is dedicated to helping others choose the health care and end-of-life experiences that best align with their values. Read More…


Nir Barzilai
Longevity Scientist

Nir asks: What if a drug that targets the process of aging could help us live longer, higher quality lives?

Israeli internist Nir Barzilai has worked with a diversity of populations–from the Israeli Army, to a Cambodian refugee camp, to a Zulu village. Perhaps his most fascinating patient population is 600 centenarians, whom he has studied to understand the biology and genetics of exceptional longevity. Read More…


Tomás Ryan
Memory Detective

Tomás asks: What if the missing memories in amnesia were actually retrievable?

Tomás Ryan dedicates his work to understanding the neuroarchitecture of memory. Challenging conventional notions of memory storage, retrieval, and brain damage, his work sets the stage for potential memory recall in patients with amnesia due to trauma, stress, alcohol and drug abuse, dementia, and aging. Read More…

We will be announcing our final two sessions in the coming weeks! For more information about TEDMED, sign up for our newsletter and subscribe to our blog. Register today to join us at TEDMED 2016 from November 30 – December 2.

Announcing TEDMED 2016 Speakers: Truth and Beauty

What if we found beauty while confronting difficult truths?

If beauty is in the eye of the beholder, then why are there experiences that humans collectively consider “beautiful?” Perhaps, when we study individuals’ subjective perspectives as a whole, they can expose universal truths and a greater sense of beauty to which we can all relate.

At TEDMED 2016’s Truth and Beauty session, we will explore research, innovations, and actions that evoke beautiful new truths about health worldwide. In this session, our TEDMED 2016 speakers share the discoveries and experiences that have led them to find Truth and Beauty. With insights from state-of-the-art holographic technology, nurses’ perspectives on healing, the neurobiology of aesthetic pleasure, and emotionally evocative video games, this session expands our understanding of health, truth, and beauty.

Our captivating lineup includes:


Anjan Chatterjee
Neuroaesthetitician 

Anjan asks: What if appreciating beauty is not just pleasurable, but essential to our survival?

Cognitive neuroscientist Anjan Chatterjee seeks to answer a tantalizing question: why is beauty so gripping? In his recent book, The Aesthetic Brain: How We Evolved to Desire Beauty and Enjoy Art, Anjan explores neural responses to beauty, noting that the faces and places we find aesthetically pleasing may promote evolutionary success. Read More…


Carolyn Jones
Photographic Ethnographer

Carolyn asks: What if we could see the beauty of invisible populations?

Through her socially proactive photographs and documentary films, Carolyn Jones points our attention towards issues of global concern. Passionate about personal stories and their power to connect us all, Carolyn examines the dying experience through the eyes of American nurses in her new film, HOPE: Dying in America. Read More…


Dan Visconti
Innovative Civic-Minded Composer

Dan asks: What if video games are works of great public art?

Dan Visconti creates concert experiences that reimagine the arts as a form of cultural and civic service. A composer and concert curator who loves American vernacular musical traditions, Dan infuses his compositions with influences from jazz, rock, blues and beyond. Read More…


James Gordon
Global DIY Healing Teacher

Jim asks: What if simple self-care techniques could help free the world from the effects of trauma?

Psychiatrist, author, White House advisor, and Georgetown Medical School Clinical Professor James Gordon is a world-renowned expert in using mind-body medicine to heal depression, anxiety, and psychological trauma. A proponent of “self-care as the true primary-care,” Jim became Founder and Director of The Center for Mind-Body Medicine in 1991. Read More…


Kellee Santiago 
Evocative Game Developer

Kellee asks: What if video games are works of great public art?

Kellee Santiago designs video games that evoke emotional responses. With research focused on game design, interactive narrative, and physical and gestural interfaces for digital media, Kellee is pushing the communicative possibilities of video games as an artistic medium. Read More…


Partho Sengupta 
Physician Holographer

Partho asks: What if advancements in visualization technology could transform patient care?

Cardiologist Partho Sengupta’s hopes to revolutionize the way we approach heart disease. By harnessing the exponential growth of cardiac visualization technology, Partho uses holograms to detect early signs of cardiovascular disease and improve patient care in the US as well as low income countries. Read More…

Look out for more speaker announcements coming soon! Sign up for our newsletter and subscribe to our blog for the latest updates. Also, don’t miss your chance to register for TEDMED 2016 this November 30 – December 2 in Palm Springs, CA. Hope to see you there!

Announcing TEDMED 2016 Speakers: Social + Science

What if social and environmental factors are inextricably entwined, not just with the culture of health, but also with its outcomes?

As children, we thought of health as sickness and cure: if we felt ill, we anticipated cough syrup, a visit to the doctor, or perhaps the unpleasant pinch of a shot. But, as we’ve aged, our understanding of health has expanded, as the field of healthcare has itself. Today, we acknowledge that health permeates all aspects of our lives–where we live, what we eat, where we work, how we age, and more. Even the simplest social interactions can shape health outcomes in ways that touch communities across the globe.

In our Social + Science session, TEDMED 2016 speakers help us explore just how social agents affect our health. From the impacts of race and poverty on human behavior to the promising potential of evidence-based medical marijuana and music therapies, this session unlocks unprecedented connections between social and scientific sides of our world. We are thrilled to introduce:


Alia Crum
Mindset Researcher

Alia asks: What if our mindset determines our health outcomes?

Stanford professor, athlete, and psychologist Alia Crum investigates the effects of mindset on core aspects of behavioral health. As the director of the Mind & Body Lab  and the health director at Stanford SPARQ, Alia leads researchers to better define and utilize the roles social and psychological forces play in overcoming chronic disease. Read More…



David Casarett
Doctorly Detective

David asks: What if mainstream healthcare operated more like a medical marijuana dispensary?

David Casarett is a palliative care physician and author who has combined an investigative first person approach   with rigorous, evidence-based medicine to make sense  of marijuana’s therapeutic potential, including its adverse   effects. David is a Full Professor of Medicine at the Duke   University School of Medicine, and Chief of Palliative  Care for the Duke Health System. Read More…


David Williams
Public Health Sociologist

David asks: What if the factors that cause some Americans to be sicker than others were as well understood as the genetic risk of disease?

David Williams has played a visible national leadership role in raising awareness levels about health disparities and identifying interventions to address them. In 2008, David was ranked as the world’s Most Cited Black Scholar in the Social Sciences, and, in 2014, Thomson Reuters ranked him as one of the World’s Most Influential Scientific Minds. Read More…


Johannes Haushofer
Money Behaviorist

Johannes asks: What if we could treat the psychological consequences of poverty?

Neurobiologist and Princeton University professor Johannes Haushofer explores whether poverty has particular psychological and neurobiological consequences, and whether these consequences, in turn, affect economic decisions. Read More…


Ketki Karanam
Musical Decoder

Ketki asks: What if we could harness the personalized therapeutic effects of music?

Biologist and technology entrepreneur Ketki Karanam harnesses music to create solutions to conditions like dementia and autism through The Sync Project. As The Sync Project’s co-founder and Head of Science, Ketki created the platform to personalize the therapeutic effects of music. Read More…


Kristin Neidlinger
Expressive Tech Fashion Designer

Kristin asks: What if wearables could reflect our innermost emotions?

Kristin Neidlinger is the founder of Sensoree, wearable technology with auditory, visual and tactile displays to promote “extimacy” (externalized intimacy) and communicate the wearer’s emotions to the outside world. With a background in dance therapy and the performing arts, Kristin works with futuristic fabrics made of sustainable materials that are embedded with sensitive technologies to enhance proximity and telepathy between human and machine. Read More…

Stay tuned for more TEDMED 2016 speaker announcements in the coming weeks. Don’t forget to stay connected by signing up for our newsletter and subscribing to our blog. Register now to join us in Palm Springs, CA this November 30 – December 2.

Announcing TEDMED 2016 Speakers: Fringe

Too often, our mental constructs and perceived limitations hinder our search for inspiration. What if the outer edges of human experience could provide solutions to everyday challenges?

This November at TEDMED 2016, speakers in a session called Fringe will explore the edges of scientific study to discover new insights from topics such as sexual deviance, extreme altruism, artistic patients, and wild adventures. They are:


Elizabeth Letourneau
Sexual Abuse Preventionist

What if we designed effective prevention programs for pedophiles before they acted out on their inappropriate desires?

Jennifer Pluznick
Sensory Receptor Hunter

What if your smell and taste receptors played a more vital role in your body than the enjoyment of food?

Larissa MacFarqhar
Human Character Investigator

What if we all felt obliged to help everyone we could?

Sarah Outen

Global DIY Adventurer
What if you could circle the earth on your own power?

Sujey Morgan
Facial Sculptor

What if modern visualization and manufacturing tools could help create better and more affordable prosthetics, including replacement faces?

Ted Meyer
Artistic Patient Advocate

What if health providers could gain a more complete understanding of their patients through art?

Early next week, we will announce the speakers we have planned for our Social+Science session. Stay tuned by signing up for our newsletter, and subscribing to the TEDMED blog. Register here to join us in Palm Springs, CA, at TEDMED 2016.

Update: TEDMED 2016 Sessions Announced!

What If? Logo

A simple question can unleash the imagination. At TEDMED, we believe that’s what it takes to spark widespread change. That’s why the TEDMED 2016 event theme is “What If?”. But, TEDMED 2016 isn’t simply about raising new questions–it’s about the important, creative conversations that follow.

If you look closely at this year’s event logo, you’ll notice that the question mark is comprised of a medley of punctuation marks that, considered together, represent rich dialogue full of questions, discovery, and possibilities. In the spirit of asking “What If?”, each of the seven sessions that drive the TEDMED 2016 stage program is grounded in a single, stimulating question. These questions will inspire our multidisciplinary community to engage in conversation and embrace the power of curiosity and collaboration.

We are delighted to share the sessions below:

 

Session1

What if social and environmental  factors are inextricably entwined, not just with the culture of health, but also with its outcomes? Where we are born, grow, live, work, and age– these circumstances can shape not only individual health, but the health of a community. But, that’s not where social determinants of health stop–there’s a whole social side to health we’re still discovering. Learn more…

 


 

Session2What if the outer edges of human experience could provide solutions to everyday challenges? Often, our mental constructs and perceived limitations hinder our search for inspiration. What if we made a point of venturing into the most unusual and unexpected places for answers? Learn more…

 


 

Session3

What if visionaries ruled the world? In a rapid-fire series of creative, short-form talks, dozens of inspiring health entrepreneurs will share how their ideas and innovations will change everything. We’ll be sharing more details about this session next week – stay tuned!

 


 

Session4

What if we could expose and confront invisible threats to health? It’s getting easier for us to monitor and keep track of our health data–but what about the influences on our health that we can’t (or won’t) see and measure? Learn more…

 


 

Session5What if we possess the knowledge to be the architects of our aging and (eventual) deaths? We’ve made significant strides in understanding exactly what happens to our bodies as we age. Might we master our bodies and soulful understanding of self to the point that we will determine the way we die? Learn more…

 


 

Session6

What if we re-examine the way we frame health challenges? Might this approach yield effective solutions to seemingly unsolvable problems? As Marcel Proust wrote, “The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes, but in having new eyes.” Learn more…

 


 

Session7

What if we found beauty while confronting difficult truths? As the adage goes, every cloud has a silver lining. Beauty in suffering may not be apparent at first, but what can happen when we stumble upon it and then share it with others? Learn more…

 


Once again, we are deeply grateful to this year’s Editorial Advisory Board and Research Scholars for dedicating their time, expertise, and wisdom to helping us designing this year’s stage program.

Over the next few weeks, we’ll be unveiling the incredible speakers, innovators, artists and performers who make up this year’s stage program. We’ll also be sharing more details about the event. To keep up with our announcements, please be sure to sign up for our newsletter and subscribe to the TEDMED blog.

We hope you’ll join us this November 30-December 2 in Palm Springs, CA. If you haven’t done so yet, be sure to register and secure your spot at TEDMED! If you have any questions, please email admissions@tedmed.com.

Announcing TEDMED 2016: What if?

Tough-minded skeptics and visionary dreamers agree on one thing: if we are going to change our world for the better, we must first imagine new possibilities.

As children, we’re encouraged to ask questions and dream big. But, as we become adults, our imagination is tamed by perceived practicality and social conformity. What if we let ourselves ask creative questions again? Where might our search for answers lead?

 

Albert Einstein quote

 

We believe that human creativity and imagination are at the heart of scientific inquiry and medical discovery, and that progress begins with a single idea. That belief is what inspired this year’s theme:

 

What If? Logo

 

TEDMED 2016 is about asking questions, the importance of conversation and dreaming big. It’s about imagining the possibilities that motivate progress in health and medicine, which can be summed up in two simple but powerful words: “What If?”

We’ll explore questions like:
– What if we created beauty in response to life’s most difficult challenges?
– What if we expose and tackle invisible threats to health?
– What if we were the architects of aging?
– What if we treated pandemics as though we lived in a borderless world?
– What if health is determined not by how, but where, we live?

At TEDMED 2016, we will experience the unmatched power of asking “what if” in health and medicine. Our program will explore a range of topics including unique approaches to understanding increasing longevity, novel visualization techniques for medical education and clinical care, therapeutic uses of 3D printing, innovations in treating mental health, and creative ways to embrace our humanity. Click here to see the priority topics considered for the TEDMED 2016 program.

We’ll begin announcing this year’s lineup of speakers, performers and innovators in the coming weeks. We look forward to sharing more details with you, the TEDMED community.

Join us this November 30–December 2 in Palm Springs, CA, as we explore provocative and inspiring questions and discussions that drive us toward a healthier world. If you have any questions about attending, please email admissions@tedmed.com.