The Smartphone Physical: The evolution of the checkup

Imagine a comprehensive, clinically relevant well-patient checkup using only smartphone-based devices. The data is immediately readable and fully uploadable to an electronic health record. The patient understands – and even participates – in the interaction far beyond faking a cough and gulping a deep breath.

For real?

Johns Hopkins medical student and Medgadget editor Shiv Gaglani says it is not only possible, but may in fact be the checkup of the future. Gaglani and a team of current and future physicians will do a first-of-its kind large-scale demo of a “smartphone physical” for hundreds of attendees at TEDMED 2013.

The checkup, which uses a unique combination of smartphone-powered devices, will capture quantitative and qualitative data, ranging from simple readings of weight and blood pressure to more complex readings such as heart rhythm strips and optic discs. Measurements and instruments will include:

Body analysis using an iHealth Scale.

• Blood pressure reading using a Withings BP Monitor.

• Oxygen saturation/pulse measured simultaneously with blood pressure, using an Masimo iSpO2 placed on the left ring finger.

• Visual acuity via an EyeNetra phone case.

• Optic disc visualization using a Welch Allyn iExaminer case attached to a PanOptic Ophthalmoscope.

• Ear drum visualization with a CellScope phone case.

• Lung function using a SpiroSmart Spirometer app to conduct a respirometer test.

•Heart electrophysiology using the AliveCor Heart Monitor.

•Body sounds: A digital stethoscope from ThinkLabs auscultates and amplifies the sounds of a patients lungs and heart.

• Carotid artery visualization using a Mobisante probe.

Image of an optic disc taken through an undilated eye with an iPhone 4 and Welch Allyn iExaminer. Around the optic disc you can see the out-of-focus iris. Photo Credit: Shiv Gaglani

While it all sounds very slick and tech-y, Gaglani says the smartphone-enabled checkup will actually improve doctor-patient relationships. For one thing, the related medical devices are generally smaller and less invasive than their predecessors.

“For example, thanks to the AliveCor Heart Monitor, it has never been easier to get a one-lead ECG reading. Similarly, the Withings and iHealth blood pressure cuffs are plug-and-play so a clinician doesn’t have to fumble around with both a stethoscope and sphygmomanometer to assess whether her patient is hypertensive,” Gaglani says.

Second, smartphone-based devices usually provide a visual or auditory output that patients can actually see and hear, hopefully increasing their understanding of their bodies and engagement during the checkup. For example, the Welch Allyn iExaminer captures an image of the retina that is displayed on the phone screen, and digital stethoscopes like ThinkLabs’ record heart and lung sounds that can be replayed through the microphone.

Third, the patient can participate in data gathering. As Gaglani says,

“These devices can abstract away the mundane and standardize the unreliable aspects of the physical exam. Measurements such as weight and blood pressure are so variable day-to-day, or even hour-to-hour, that an annual exam doesn’t provide much insight into an individual patient’s health status. Some of the smartphone devices are already being used by patients to collect and store their data so when they see their clinicians they can have productive and informed conversations, rather than relying on fragmented and unreliable metrics.”

Hypothetically, once the data is uploaded to an electronic medical record, back-end clinical decision support software can help both patients and clinicians come up with treatment plans.

The technology may of course be particularly helpful for mobile physicians, particularly in emergency health care settings, and for global health workers, as even untrained staffers can carry the tools to low-resource settings to collect data and then, via telemedicine, receive instructions for how to treat patients. Some of these tools are already being combined into a versatile clinical data-gathering device, called a Tricorder, Gaglani says.

How long will it be before we’re all having our own smartphone physicals every one or two years?  Devices such as the body analysis scale, blood pressure cuff, pulse oximeter, and ECG are already in use as teaching devices in med schools and by some patients, and some early adopting clinicians are using them in daily life. TEDMED speaker Eric Topol has been integrating smartphone-based devices into his practice over the last few years and most recently used his AliveCor to diagnose a passenger-in-distress on an airplane as well as the CellScope Oto to visualize Stephen Colbert’s ear drum on the “Colbert Report.”

While there will be an inevitable learning curve and hopefully constant assessments of cost-effectiveness and value to patients, Gaglani says some of these devices, or at least second and third generation versions, will successfully make their way into the clinic.

“Whatever form these devices are applied, chances are high that more than one person’s life will be improved as a result,” he says.

Visit www.smartphonephysical.org for more information.

The Smartphone Physical at TEDMED will take place in an “exam room of the future,” developed by Nurture.  Click here for more information.

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  1. Pingback: The Smartphone Physical: The evolution of the checkup | TEDMED Blog | Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care | Scoop.it

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  17.  
    Regina Patterson
    2 years ago

    This is such an awesome experience. We, at Nurture by Steelcase, are proud to partner with Medgadget and TEDMED to bring this event to this years event. We can’t wait for the attendees to experience it.

  18. Pingback: The Smartphone Physical: The evolution of the c...

  19.  
    Katherine Ellington
    2 years ago

    Most people dread getting a check up, but I see real excitement about The Smart Phone Physical. Those who show up in The Hive will see tools. How long does the full physical exam take? Can you schedule an appointment in advance. Can you schedule appointment online? ZocDoc style?

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  21.  
    NAVRAJ JAIN
    2 years ago

    The Smartphone Physical + Google Glass Gadget+Pico Projector = Health care for Bottom of Pyramid?

  22.  
    Munjal Thakar
    2 years ago

    At TEDMEDLiveTheOtherSong to be held on April 21, 2013 we have another of such a device called the “Swasthya Slate” designed & developed by Dr.Kanav Kahol. The “Swasthya Slate”- keeping in mind the Indian economy, especially the rural set up is LOW COST and does several of the functions “The Smartphone Physical” does. Watch him soon…

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  24.  
    Stephanie Van
    2 years ago

    getting a smart phone physical was so fun. i got an ekg and an ultrasound of my carotids in under three minutes simply sitting (reclining, really) in a chair. it was a much more interactive experience as the physician demonstrated and explained each iPhone attachment. i cannot wait until the apps are all combined and can upload data easily and efficiently into one health database. hopefully once i’m done with medical school, these gadgets will fill my white coat pockets and i’ll feel equipped to perform a physical and engage my patients in the process.

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