Why be normal? Q&A with Rosie King

Rosie King diagnosed herself with a high functioning form of autism (Asperger’s Syndrome) at age nine and has become a spokesperson for autism in the United Kingdom, including hosting an Emmy award winning BBC documentary on the subject. Shortly after her 16th birthday, she spoke on the TEDMED 2014 stage about her journey.

We asked Rosie a few questions to learn more about her remarkable story.

Why does this talk matter now?

I think the ideas I share in my talk have always mattered.  Society is at a stage where it is beginning to understand equality– I want this to move on from addressing racism and sexism, to addressing discrimination in all areas.  This is the only way to have a civilized society.

Gratefully not normal: "I wouldn't trade in my autism and my imagination for the world." Rosie King, TEDMED 2014.

“I wouldn’t trade in my autism and my imagination for the world.” Rosie King, TEDMED 2014. Photo, Sandy Huffaker for TEDMED.

What legacy would you like to leave?

I want everyone in the world to know that it is important to be themselves.  I come from a family where everyone is different.  We could be a sad family but we have always been encouraged to be proud of ourselves and celebrate our talents.  If the whole world was like my family then it would be a joyful world.  I want to take a little bit of my family’s attitude out there.  It could be like flicking a switch, and I hope that my talk will be that switch.  To ask someone to be anything other than who they really are is cruel, like killing their real self.  Also, that genuine self that could bring so much color to the world!

What did you learn at TEDMED?

Denise [TEDMED speaker coach] taught me about body language and how to speak to a big audience–  that was useful.  I also listened to a very interesting talk [Rebecca Adamson] about how Native American people were treated.  This made me very upset but also glad that it was being brought to light.

For all inquiries regarding speaking engagements or to learn more about her current work, please contact Joanna Jones.

Keep up with Rosie and her family on their blog, My Perfectly Imperfect Family, and check out the books Rosie has illustrated authored by her mother, Sharon.