Games and Health: Q&A with Brian Primack

At TEDMED 2014, Brian Primack, Clinician, Professor, and Assistant Vice Chancellor of Research on Health and Society at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, shed light on how principles learned from video game design can be used to create more effective health behavior change. We caught up with Brian to learn more about his work and his experience at TEDMED 2014.

How healthcare can learn from video games. Jerod Harris, TEDMED2014. Photo: Sandy Huffaker for TEDMED.
The video games industry is really good at getting people to perform certain tasks and to stick with them for the long haul.” Expert design including instant reward, social networks, and intermediate milestones can effectively improve patient outcomes. Photo: Jerod Harris for TEDMED.

Personally, what do you prefer: “old-school” video games, or the most recent technology? Why?

I prefer old-school video games. Part of it may be nostalgia. However, I also think that sometimes, simpler graphics and can translate into a richer imaginative experience. For example, I still sometimes play old Infocom games. Infocom created brilliant text-only interactive fiction games starting in the early 1980s.

Do you encourage your children to play video games?

My kids (ages 7 and 10) play video games, and I often play with them. Some of our favorites are logic, simulation, and/or physics games such as Civiballs, Meeblings, and Bloons Tower Defense. What I encourage even more than playing, however, is creating video games. Both of my kids can do basic programming on MIT’s Scratch platform and have created simple games of their own.

Beyond health and medicine, what other applications or fields do you see gamification having a large impact on?

Gamification may be very valuable in education. I think there is an important balance to be struck, though. I think it’s great to leverage the tools we have now to make learning more engaging. However, we also want to encourage people ultimately to learn for its own sake, not just because they are getting points or incentives. I don’t think these positions are mutually exclusive, but balance is important to think about as we develop new educational tools.

What kind of meaningful or surprising connections did you make at TEDMED?

I really appreciated the opportunity to reconnect with some past colleagues; it was also invigorating to meet people whose work I had admired from afar. I caught up with Lee Sanders, MD, MPH, Chief of the Division of General Pediatrics at Stanford; he’s well-known for his work on promotion of child and family health via health literacy.

What’s next for you?

Our Center for Research on Media, Technology, and Health continues to research both the positive and negative influences of media and technology on health outcomes. We develop and test interventions to support positive attributes of media and technology while also buffering their potential negative influences.

Zoobiquitous Medicine: Q&A with Barbara Natterson-Horowitz

Barbara Natterson-Horowitz, Professor of Medicine in the Division of Cardiology at UCLA Medical School, offered an unusual perspective on how human patients, including those suffering from mental illnesses, can be helped by applying insights from animal health. We caught up with Barbara to learn more about how her Zoobiquity idea improves understanding of ourselves and the natural world.

Zoobiquitous Medicine. Barbara Natterson-Horowitz at TEDMED2014. Photo: Sandy Huffaker for TEDMED.
“When I see a human patient, I always ask, ‘What do the animal doctors know about this problem that I don’t know?'” Barbara Natterson-Horowitz at TEDMED2014. [Photo: Sandy Huffaker for TEDMED.]

What motivated you to speak at TEDMED?

After 20 years of practicing cardiology taking care of patients with heart attacks and high cholesterol, I was thrust into the world of veterinary medicine. Seeing my human patients as human-animal patients completely changed how I practice medicine and understand health and disease. Insights from this species-spanning approach to medicine can benefit human and animal practitioners and patients alike. It’s thrilling to introduce this approach to physicians, psychologists, dentists, nurses, etc. and watch their viewpoints transform; the exposure at TEDMED led to a collaboration between a celebrated human breast cancer physician studying a mutation that causes breast cancer in women with a veterinary oncologist working on the same mutation that causes breast cancer in jaguars and other animals!

Why does this talk matter now?

Animals and humans get basically the same diseases. From heart failure, diabetes and brain tumors to anxiety disorders and compulsions, the challenges we face aren’t uniquely human. Discovering why, where, and how non-human animals get sick reveals crucial but hidden clues to human health and illness. For instance:

Breast cancer: When beluga whales began dying of breast and colon cancer in the St. Lawrence estuary, a parallel epidemic of breast cancers in women was discovered in the same region. This species-spanning breast cancer outbreak was ultimately linked to toxins from local aluminum smelting plants.

Obesity: Medical insights into obesity — which challenges physicians and veterinarians alike as animal and human patients are becoming more fat — are generated by a zoobiquitous approach.  Awareness of worsening obesity in domestic and wild animal populations challenges us to consider environmental factors including endocrine disrupting chemicals,  antibiotics, and even climate change as contributors to the “plurality of obesity epidemics.”

Infectious disease: The majority of infections that could create human pandemics come from animal communities. From Ebola to West Nile Virus, SARS to H1N1, some of most worrisome threats to human health and survival are encountered first by veterinarians and animal experts. If we fail to pay attention to these experts and miss out on the opportunity to collaborate, we lose crucial information and increase unnecessary risk for human populations.

How do you see your work fitting into species-survival, wildlife preservation and conservation?

Zoobiquity emphasizes the interconnectedness of animal and human lives and ecosystems. Animals can be sentinels of disease in humans. When horses in Venezuela start to die, it can mean equine encephalitis may threaten local human populations. When cormorants and crows get sick with West Nile virus in Queens and the Bronx, elderly and immunocompromised patients may also be at risk for the virus. On the other hand, humans can be sentinels of disease in animals. Human outbreaks of Brucellosis often lead to identification of sick and suffering animals. The detection of lead poisoning in a child often leads to exposure and disease in local wildlife. Bringing practitioners of animal and human health together encourages the transfer of information from the world of human medicine that is vitally relevant and important to wild animal populations.

What do you hope for the legacy of Zoobiquity? 

Zoobiquity Conferences have now been held across the US and internationally. At these events human health practitioners including physicians, nurses, dentists, psychologists and others come together with animal health practitioners including veterinarians, behaviorists, nutritionists and others to discuss the shared diseases of their different species. I’ve heard some veterinarians joke, “real doctors take care of many species.” Bringing the comparative approach to the human medical community has the power to transform how physicians, nurses, psychotherapists and others understand disease, their patients and the environmental and evolutionary factors that link us all together.  I hope Zoobiquity is successful in bridging the worlds of animal and human health, ecology and evolutionary biology.

Check out our archived Facebook chat with Barbara about species-spanning medicine. 

What is Culinary Medicine? Q&A with John La Puma

Nutrition specialist, chef, author, and practicing physician John La Puma lives and works on an organic farm in California. He makes his garbanzo guacamole recipe on the TEDMED stage while sharing his philosophy that the food we eat is as important as the pills we take, a key component of preventive health and our well being.  On the TEDMED Blog, John elaborates on culinary medicine and what role patients may have taking charge of their health and even educating their physicians about how to consider nutrition as part of the treatment plan.

John La Puma on culinary medicine
“Food is the most important healthcare intervention we have against chronic disease.” John La Puma, TEDMED 2014. Photo: Jerod Harris for TEDMED.

Why does this talk matter now?

Patients who ask their doctors, “What should I eat for my condition?” really want answers. Meanwhile, clinicians are clamoring for more and better information and training on nutrition. Culinary medicine is a new evidence-based field in medicine that blends the art of food and cooking with the science of medicine to yield high-quality meals and beverages which aim to improve the patient’s condition. It is already being taught in both undergraduate and postgraduate medical education.

What impact do you hope the talk will have?

I hope that the talk will help accelerate the cultural shift in healthcare towards wellness and well-being as primary goals in medicine. People need to know that some physicians care deeply about helping them become well with what they eat.

What is the legacy you want to leave?

Our mission is to inspire health-conscious consumers to look, feel and actually be measurably healthier by what they eat. The opportunity to use culinary medicine to prevent and treat disease is substantial, and culinary medicine should be considered as part of both the medical history and treatment plan in medicine.

How would medicine change if your ideas become reality?

All clinicians should be able to write culinary medicine prescriptions and know how food, like medicine, works in the body. I’d like to see condition-specific food and lifestyle measures become something that clinicians can offer, effectively, before prescription medication for most chronic conditions.

What is your core belief about culinary medicine?

Everyone has a right to clean, healthful, delicious, real food that both satisfies their appetite and makes or keeps them well…before it may be too late to offer more than comfort food.

Please share anything else you wish you could have included in your talk.

70% of heart disease, stroke, diabetes, memory loss, premature wrinkling and impotence are preventable. 80% of cancers and much of asthma and lung disease are preventable, and from environmental causes, like toxin exposure or diet.*  Knowing more about what’s in your food and how it got there can help you take your own health into your own hands, save you money and provide joy and energy for those you love. With culinary medicine, health-conscious people can live life to its youngest.

Ask your doctor, “What do I eat for my condition?”  If he or she doesn’t know, do your own research- here’s my list of resources.

Now it’s time to try John’s Luscious & Rich Garbanzo Guacamole recipe!

1 ripe medium avocado, preferably Haas

1 medium clove of garlic, peeled, diced and creamed with lime zest

1 medium serrano chile pepper, stemmed and diced, but not seeded

1/4 teaspoon minced lime zest, preferably organic

2 tablespoons fresh lime juice (about 1 medium lime)

1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil, COOC preferred

1/2 cup cooked chickpeas, rinsed and drained

1/2 teaspoon yellow curry powder, such as Madras curry

1/4 teaspoon black pepper

5 sturdy springs cilantro or Italian flat leaf parsley (optional)

Cut the avocado in half long-wise around the pit and separate the halves. Remove the pit.

Use a spoon to scoop around the flesh and remove it in one piece.

Place upside down on a cutting board, dice into large chunks. Scoop up and place in a large stainless steel bowl.

Add the garlic, chile, zest, juice and oil, and mix by hand with a fork or a tablespoon.

Smash the chickpeas with the flat side of a chef’s knife, to break the skin. Sprinkle the curry and black pepper on the garbanzos, add to the bowl, mix again, and top with herb garnish if desired.

Serve with corn tortillas or toasted chips, sliced jicama triangles and sliced cucumber circles. Enjoy!

Nutritional Data Per Serving (3 servings):193 calories, 17 g carbs, 14 g fat, 3 g protein, 125 mg sodium, 7 gram fiber.

Adapted from La Puma J. “ChefMD’s Big Book of Culinary Medicine”, Crown, 2008.

(c) John La Puma, MD, Santa Barbara, CA, 10.2013

*See John’s TEDMED bio page for references and resources that support these claims.

Why be normal? Q&A with Rosie King

Rosie King diagnosed herself with a high functioning form of autism (Asperger’s Syndrome) at age nine and has become a spokesperson for autism in the United Kingdom, including hosting an Emmy award winning BBC documentary on the subject. Shortly after her 16th birthday, she spoke on the TEDMED 2014 stage about her journey.

We asked Rosie a few questions to learn more about her remarkable story.

Why does this talk matter now?

I think the ideas I share in my talk have always mattered.  Society is at a stage where it is beginning to understand equality– I want this to move on from addressing racism and sexism, to addressing discrimination in all areas.  This is the only way to have a civilized society.

Gratefully not normal: "I wouldn't trade in my autism and my imagination for the world." Rosie King, TEDMED 2014.
“I wouldn’t trade in my autism and my imagination for the world.” Rosie King, TEDMED 2014. Photo, Sandy Huffaker for TEDMED.

What legacy would you like to leave?

I want everyone in the world to know that it is important to be themselves.  I come from a family where everyone is different.  We could be a sad family but we have always been encouraged to be proud of ourselves and celebrate our talents.  If the whole world was like my family then it would be a joyful world.  I want to take a little bit of my family’s attitude out there.  It could be like flicking a switch, and I hope that my talk will be that switch.  To ask someone to be anything other than who they really are is cruel, like killing their real self.  Also, that genuine self that could bring so much color to the world!

What did you learn at TEDMED?

Denise [TEDMED speaker coach] taught me about body language and how to speak to a big audience–  that was useful.  I also listened to a very interesting talk [Rebecca Adamson] about how Native American people were treated.  This made me very upset but also glad that it was being brought to light.

For all inquiries regarding speaking engagements or to learn more about her current work, please contact Joanna Jones.

Keep up with Rosie and her family on their blog, My Perfectly Imperfect Family, and check out the books Rosie has illustrated authored by her mother, Sharon.

Reimagining an old technology: Q&A with Drew Lakatos

Engineer and entrepreneur Drew Lakatos, CEO of ActiveProtective, created a smart garment that uses airbag technology to protect the elderly from hip fractures when they fall. We caught up with Drew and learned more about his work and experience at TEDMED 2014.

Reimagining
Reimagining an old technology. Drew Lakatos, TEDMED 2014. Photo: Sandy Huffaker for TEDMED.

What motivated you to speak at TEDMED?

We are introducing a new technology (that repurposes an old one) that most people will scratch their heads the first time they hear or see it.  Only after studying the problem, as well as its size and scope, does it become clear that there really is no other way to prevent hip fractures in the frail elderly.  By sharing it at TEDMED, we hope to raise awareness and begin familiarizing it as an intuitive treatment for those at highest risk.

Why does this talk matter now? What impact do you hope the talk will have?

This talk matters now because of the seismic shift required to shift our “sick-care” system to a “healthcare” one by introducing, proving, and promoting preventive technologies that can completely avoid these tragic, expensive, death-sentence episodes of injury.

What were the top TEDMED2014 talks that left an impression with you?

I was shaken watching Marc Koska’s hidden video of a healthcare worker sharing needles of HIV+ patients. I was moved by Debra Jarvis’ warmth and honesty, and inspired by her heartfelt talk. I was touched, confused, and still processing Bob Carey’s Tutu Project. I don’t know where to store the images in my head, and loved his raw honesty.

What happens when doctors move towards transparency? Q&A with Leana Wen

Physician and public health advocate Leana Wen discussed a highly controversial approach to transparency in the clinical encounter. We caught up with Leana to learn more about her ideas and actions in public health advocacy.

What happens when doctors move toward transparency?
“I want doctors and patients to come together to end the sickness of fear.” Leana Wen, TEDMED 2014. Photo: Sandy Huffaker for TEDMED

What motivated you to speak at TEDMED? I wanted to share a message to doctors, patients, innovators, and all those who are committed to transforming the future of medicine. There is no place better to do that than at TEDMED, in front of people want to learn paradigm-changing ideas and who are already motivated to take action!

Why does this talk matter now? What impact do you hope the talk will have? It’s harder for people now than ever to establish a long-term, trusting relationship with their doctor. There is a growing disconnect between what patients need and what doctors do. I explain in this talk how radical transparency will empower both patients and doctors (and other providers). I hope doctors watching the talk will choose radical transparency and voluntarily disclose both financial conflicts and personal views to their patients. I also hope patients—people—watching the talk will prioritize transparency and choose their doctors accordingly.

What were the top TEDMED2014 talks that made an impression on you? Sonia Shah flipped my conception of cause and effect, and how we may need to change the focus of public health and medical interventions. Eleanor Bimla Schwarz stopped me in my tracks to appreciate how our bodies are made, and how our efforts to interfere with normal body processes can have downstream adverse consequences. Gail Reed and Sigrid Fry-Revere challenged me away from U.S.-centric thinking to consider there is much to learn from how other countries serve patients.

What is the legacy you want to leave? I want doctors and patients to come together to end the sickness of fear. Doctors can take the first step, and let patients into our world. We can ensure patients and their families take part in all bedside rounds. We can embrace open medical records and open disclosure of medical errors. We can show vulnerability and humility with our patients. These are all steps to change the paradigm of medicine from one of secrecy and hierarchy to one that is fully open and engaged. I would love to live in a world where doctors and patients (and all healthcare providers) come together to be equal partners in medical care, without barriers or secrets or fears.

Please share anything else you wish you could have included in your talk. I wish I had more time to talk about how transparency may seem scary, but that research shows openness helps doctors as well as patients. There are studies that show collaborative medical records and open disclosure of medical errors increase patient trust, improve health outcomes, and even decrease malpractice. This will be particularly important as doctors are being measured on quality metrics like diabetes and blood pressure control. Lifestyle changes require trust, and trust requires transparency.

How ultrasound became a disruptive innovation

Resa Lewiss, Director of Point-of-Care Ultrasound and Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine and Radiology at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, unlocked imaginations about ultrasound applications in her talk at TEDMED2014. She explained why and how ultrasound at the bedside has become a game changer for clinical care.

She recently took a moment from her duties in Denver to share more about her work and impressions of TEDMED.

Resa Lewiss: How Ultrasound Has Become a Disruptive Innovation
Reas Lewiss at TEDMED2014. Photo by Sandy Huffaker for TEDMED

What motivated you to speak at TEDMED?

I attended TEDMED2013 in Washington DC. I was inspired by the people, the space and the vision of TEDMED. I believe that the arts inspire creativity and innovation. And innovation begets innovation. I live the aphorism mens sana in corpore sano, [a sound mind in a sound body]. TEDMED does too.

Why does this talk matter now? What impact do you hope the talk will have?

This talk will hopefully deconstruct healthcare silos. Point-of-care in partnership with ultrasound can be a concept that is difficult to comprehend. I hope to have connected the dots between the technology and the resultant improvement in patient care- for health care providers, people in tech and people in the world. The safety profile, time efficiency and cost effectiveness are self-evident.

Tell us about the top 3 TEDMED2014 talks or performances that left an impression with you.

Jill Vialet: Sobering reminder for ourselves and loved ones. Play is healthy.

Barbara Natterson-Horowitz: Back to basics, obvious and inherent and yet never quite articulated in this way before.

Bob Carey: Honest and emotional. Much respect for his willingness to show his vulnerability; a sobering performance.

Robin Guenther: She hit it on the head. Who is looking out for the healing and healers? Thank goodness she is. Mens sana in corpore sano.

What is the legacy you want to leave?

One of quality, integrity, justice, honesty, excellence, and mindfulness.

Contact Resa to learn more about how to encourage point-of-care ultrasound curricula integration at all medical schools and for all providers.

Resa Lewiss at TEDMED2014. Photo by Sandy Huffaker for TEDMED.

Notably Ig Nobel: Science humor

Author and newspaper columnist Marc Abrahams is the editor of the science humor magazine Annals of Improbable Research. At TEDMED 2014 he shared laughter- and thought-provoking stories behind some of the winners of the Ig Nobel Prize Ceremony, which he founded and hosts. Almost all humor aside, Marc snuck away from his duties for a few moments to answer questions for us.

Marc Abrahams at TEDMED 2014: Science Humor
Marc Abrahams at TEDMED 2014. Photo: Sandy Huffaker for TEDMED

Why does this talk matter now? What impact do you hope the talk will have?

People are sometimes given very serious advice about their health by Very Important People who know little and assume much. Look at the crazy advice that some politicians and some journalists are giving us — “Don’t vaccinate your kids!”, “Ebola was created by evil people who want to attack the American public!”. If someone — no matter who it is — tells you something that seems absurd, the best thing you can do is laugh, if it strikes you as funny… and then go find out the facts, and think about them. And THEN decide what you think about their advice.

What kind of meaningful or surprising connections did you make at TEDMED?

Three people each told me about scarily good candidates for future Ig Nobel Prizes. I probably would never have heard of any of those nominees if I hadn’t gone to TEDMED. (Sorry — I am not permitted to tell you anything about those nominees. We have rules, y’know.)

What is the legacy you want to leave?

I hope I helped at least a few people decide that it’s okay to make their own decisions — rather than simply accept what some authoritative person told them — about what’s good and what’s bad, and what’s important and what’s not.  

Anything else you wish you could have included in your talk?

Well, of course I wanted to tell the story of homosexual necrophilia in the mallard duck. But there wasn’t time. And anyway, Kees Moeliker, the scientist who made that discovery, is the best person to tell that story, which he did in an obscure biology journal, and then at the 2003 Ig Nobel Prize ceremony, and then again years later in a TED talk.

Can you share some highlights from the 2014 Ig Nobel Prize ceremony?

The on-stage demonstration of the technique that won this year’s Ig Nobel Prize for medicine. It was awarded to a team from the U.S. and India for treating “uncontrollable” nosebleeds using the method of nasal packing with strips of cured pork. Before that night, I had never in my life met anyone who had disguised himself as a polar bear to frighten a reindeer. I am very pleased with the premiere performance — as part of the ceremony  — of “What’s Eating You”, the mini-opera about a couple who decided to stop eating regular food, and instead get all their nutrients from pills. The lead singers were magnificent, and so was the chorus of their intestinal microbes.

What was your favorite winner from the 2014 Ig Nobel prize ceremony?

I am entranced by the Nutrition Prize winners — Raquel Rubio, Anna Jofré, Belén Martín, Teresa Aymerich, and Margarita Garriga, who published a study titled “Characterization of Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Infant Faeces as Potential Probiotic Starter Cultures for Fermented Sausages.” They could not travel to the ceremony, so instead sent us a mesmerizing half-minute-long video in which they explain what they did and why, and then eat some of the sausage. MA2

Claim your experience: Beyond the survivor identity

In her 2014 TEDMED talk, Debra Jarvis, a writer and former hospital chaplain, offered a witty and daring look at the way that survivors of disease and trauma can achieve new levels of emotional and psychological healing. We caught up with Debra in between her sabbatical adventures in Europe.

Debra Jarvis, Cancer Survivor
Debra Jarvis at TEDMED 2014, Photo: Sandy Huffaker

What motivated you to speak at TEDMED?

As a chaplain I always walk the line between science and spirituality. I knew that I had a unique perspective as a hospital chaplain, as a family member of someone with cancer and as a patient myself. So I had seen the issue of survivorship from all these different perspectives and knew TEDMED was a perfect venue to give a voice to the many patients who talked to me over the years. I spoke for a lot of people in that talk.

Why does this talk matter now? What impact do you hope the talk will have?

This talk matters now because the pressure to be a “participating” survivor is high and although I think funding cancer research is important, taking on this identity can keep people stuck.  Although the context of my talk is specific — taking on “cancer survivor” as an identity — I hope  that listeners/viewers will realize that the problem is universal. Taking on any kind of “victim/survivor” identity is deadly. It can be cancer, it can be a car crash, it can be being dumped by a lover! My suggestion remains the same: Process your feelings, mine the experience for all it’s worth and then move on. Keep growing. Keep becoming.

What kind of meaningful or surprising connections did you make at TEDMED?

The best thing for me about TEDMED was being around so many people who are using their power for good. As Spiderman’s uncle said, “With great power comes great responsibility.” And so many of the speakers there were using their brains, education and energy to find solutions to some of the world’s thorniest problems. They are taking on great responsibilities, and that is inspiring.

What is the legacy you want to leave?

“Claim your experience. Don’t let it claim you.”

Anything else you wish you could have included in your talk?   

I wish I had time to talk about knowing the difference between being truly wounded and simply not getting what you want. The latter is your ego stamping its little foot and whining. I would have also loved to talk about what it would be like to not carry a wound, but instead carry a scar. A scar is so much stronger than the original tissue! And finally, I wish I could have included why I think we get so excited about surviving: It’s because we are so afraid of death. It’s like, “You’re a survivor!” but the unspoken thought is, “For now.” Because ultimately, no one survives. Americans in particular are loathe to face this. I would have loved to talk about teaching our children not to fear death and to give some great examples I’ve seen of how to do that.

It’s smart to design simple: Q&A with Josh Stein

On the TEDMED stage, serial entrepreneur and CEO & Co-founder of AdhereTech Josh Stein shared what he’s learned about designing ‘smart’ devices and the internet of things as they relate to positively influencing patient behavior. We caught up with Josh to learn more.

The Internet of Medical Things
Connected Medical Devices Will Revolutionize Healthcare… If Patients Actually Use Them. Josh Stein at TEDMED2014. (Photo: Sandy Huffaker for TEDMED)

Why does the talk matter now? What impact do you hope the talk will have?

The Internet of Medical Things is going through a period of incredible growth, which is absolutely fantastic for patients! However, there’s an enormous design hurdle in regard to user adoption, and this hurdle is largely ignored. In short, there is too great a focus on what these devices can do, and not enough focus on how these devices will actually do it.

The Internet of Things, (IoT), or ‘smart’ devices, can be separated into two distinct categories: devices that users purchase and devices they don’t purchase.

Most IoT devices fall into the former category. Users will pay a lot of their own money for a gorgeous new smart phone, TV, or fitness tracker because these gadgets provide an immediate benefit to the user (they are awesome and fun to use). In these instances, consumers are willing to go through a reasonable set up and learning process for these devices.

In contrast, a large percentage of smart IoT medical devices actually fall into the latter category: users don’t buy these devices, and they are provided to users by a third party. This occurs because: 1) other parties subsidize these tools in order to improve patient outcomes and thereby decreasing overall costs or increasing revenue, 2) consumers typically don’t like to pay for medical devices, and 3) consumers typically don’t see a tangible immediate benefit from these devices.

The reason why this distinction is so important is that most smart medical devices are designed as if they fall into the former category, at least from a user-experience perspective, when they actually fall into the latter category. Thus, these smart med devices are designed as if patients will go through a long and complicated set up process to use said devices, when in reality the patient will not perform such tasks. Patients are simply expected to do way too much in order to use most smart med devices.

I shared this thought at TEDMED 2014 with the hope that this notion will resonate with other smart medical device creators. This could potentially lead to improved devices and better patient health.

What kind of meaningful or surprising connections did you make at TEDMED?

I met Jim Madara, the CEO of AMA; he and his team spoke about the innovative ways in which they are revolutionizing how medicine is taught. I met Marc Koska; his syringe is one of the most ingenious medical devices that I have ever seen. It solves a huge problem through simplicity and understanding its user. I built a relationship with an individual who is innovating clinical trials at one of the most innovative companies in healthcare. I don’t want to mention this person’s name because, though this introduction, my company is now planning an engagement with his incredible organization. Stay tuned for updates on this collaboration – we’ll keep TEDMED in the loop!

I also met one of my favorite stand-up comedians, Tig Notaro. Her TEDMED talk was awe-inspiring, and it was amazing to see a whole other side to her. I can’t say enough great things about her and her work!

I had the pleasure of speaking with Jay Walker. His wisdom and advice has directly impacted product and vision of my company. I genuinely attribute a great deal of our success to the conversations I’ve had with him.

What is the legacy you want to leave?

I want to be known as someone who has a net positive benefit on the world. Professionally, I believe I’m on the right track with the innovative work that my team and I are doing –  our product has been improving the adherence and outcomes of patients since 2013. We work long hours, but seeing improved patient health and traction continues to motivate us.