Announcing TEDMED 2016 Speakers: Social + Science

What if social and environmental factors are inextricably entwined, not just with the culture of health, but also with its outcomes?

As children, we thought of health as sickness and cure: if we felt ill, we anticipated cough syrup, a visit to the doctor, or perhaps the unpleasant pinch of a shot. But, as we’ve aged, our understanding of health has expanded, as the field of healthcare has itself. Today, we acknowledge that health permeates all aspects of our lives–where we live, what we eat, where we work, how we age, and more. Even the simplest social interactions can shape health outcomes in ways that touch communities across the globe.

In our Social + Science session, TEDMED 2016 speakers help us explore just how social agents affect our health. From the impacts of race and poverty on human behavior to the promising potential of evidence-based medical marijuana and music therapies, this session unlocks unprecedented connections between social and scientific sides of our world. We are thrilled to introduce:


Alia Crum
Mindset Researcher

Alia asks: What if our mindset determines our health outcomes?

Stanford professor, athlete, and psychologist Alia Crum investigates the effects of mindset on core aspects of behavioral health. As the director of the Mind & Body Lab  and the health director at Stanford SPARQ, Alia leads researchers to better define and utilize the roles social and psychological forces play in overcoming chronic disease. Read More…



David Casarett
Doctorly Detective

David asks: What if mainstream healthcare operated more like a medical marijuana dispensary?

David Casarett is a palliative care physician and author who has combined an investigative first person approach   with rigorous, evidence-based medicine to make sense  of marijuana’s therapeutic potential, including its adverse   effects. David is a Full Professor of Medicine at the Duke   University School of Medicine, and Chief of Palliative  Care for the Duke Health System. Read More…


David Williams
Public Health Sociologist

David asks: What if the factors that cause some Americans to be sicker than others were as well understood as the genetic risk of disease?

David Williams has played a visible national leadership role in raising awareness levels about health disparities and identifying interventions to address them. In 2008, David was ranked as the world’s Most Cited Black Scholar in the Social Sciences, and, in 2014, Thomson Reuters ranked him as one of the World’s Most Influential Scientific Minds. Read More…


Johannes Haushofer
Money Behaviorist

Johannes asks: What if we could treat the psychological consequences of poverty?

Neurobiologist and Princeton University professor Johannes Haushofer explores whether poverty has particular psychological and neurobiological consequences, and whether these consequences, in turn, affect economic decisions. Read More…


Ketki Karanam
Musical Decoder

Ketki asks: What if we could harness the personalized therapeutic effects of music?

Biologist and technology entrepreneur Ketki Karanam harnesses music to create solutions to conditions like dementia and autism through The Sync Project. As The Sync Project’s co-founder and Head of Science, Ketki created the platform to personalize the therapeutic effects of music. Read More…


Kristin Neidlinger
Expressive Tech Fashion Designer

Kristin asks: What if wearables could reflect our innermost emotions?

Kristin Neidlinger is the founder of Sensoree, wearable technology with auditory, visual and tactile displays to promote “extimacy” (externalized intimacy) and communicate the wearer’s emotions to the outside world. With a background in dance therapy and the performing arts, Kristin works with futuristic fabrics made of sustainable materials that are embedded with sensitive technologies to enhance proximity and telepathy between human and machine. Read More…

Stay tuned for more TEDMED 2016 speaker announcements in the coming weeks. Don’t forget to stay connected by signing up for our newsletter and subscribing to our blog. Register now to join us in Palm Springs, CA this November 30 – December 2.

Announcing TEDMED 2016 Speakers: Fringe

Too often, our mental constructs and perceived limitations hinder our search for inspiration. What if the outer edges of human experience could provide solutions to everyday challenges?

This November at TEDMED 2016, speakers in a session called Fringe will explore the edges of scientific study to discover new insights from topics such as sexual deviance, extreme altruism, artistic patients, and wild adventures. They are:


Elizabeth Letourneau
Sexual Abuse Preventionist

What if we designed effective prevention programs for pedophiles before they acted out on their inappropriate desires?

Jennifer Pluznick
Sensory Receptor Hunter

What if your smell and taste receptors played a more vital role in your body than the enjoyment of food?

Larissa MacFarqhar
Human Character Investigator

What if we all felt obliged to help everyone we could?

Sarah Outen

Global DIY Adventurer
What if you could circle the earth on your own power?

Sujey Morgan
Facial Sculptor

What if modern visualization and manufacturing tools could help create better and more affordable prosthetics, including replacement faces?

Ted Meyer
Artistic Patient Advocate

What if health providers could gain a more complete understanding of their patients through art?

Early next week, we will announce the speakers we have planned for our Social+Science session. Stay tuned by signing up for our newsletter, and subscribing to the TEDMED blog. Register here to join us in Palm Springs, CA, at TEDMED 2016.

Announcing Speakers for TEDMED 2016: New Models

As Marcel Proust once wrote, “The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes, but in having new eyes.”

What if we re-examine the way we frame health challenges, and saw them through new eyes? At TEDMED 2016, speakers in our New Models session will tackle this question and explore how novel approaches can yield effective solutions to seemingly unsolvable problems. They will discuss a range of topics, including the treatment of rare diseases, homelessness, robotic vision, and mental illness with fresh paradigms.

We are delighted to announce the speakers who will take the stage in this remarkable session. They are:


CharlesChiu_WebCircleCharles Chiu
Precision Diagnostician

What if next generation sequencing could help us diagnose mysterious infectious illnesses?

KaitlynHove_WebCircle

Kaitlyn Hova
Synesthete Translator

What if you could hear color or taste sound?

KafuiDzirasa_WebCircle Kafui Dzirasa
Brain Engineer

What if we diagnosed and treated mental illness as a brain electrical circuit malfunction?

LloydPendleton_WebCircle

Lloyd Pendleton
Homelessness Vanquisher

What if we could eliminate homelessness nationwide?

MarySpio_WebCircle

Mary Spio
Innovation For Good Evangelist

What if virtual reality could improve healthcare?

SharonTerry_WebCircle

Sharon Terry
Citizen Biomedical Researcher

What if people spearheaded research into their conditions?

SheilaNirenberg_WebCircleSheila Nirenberg
Visionary Neuroscientist

What if robots could process visual information the way humans do?

We’ll be announcing more TEDMED 2016 speakers later this week. Stay updated by signing up for our newsletter, and subscribing to the TEDMED blog.If you haven’t done so already, register today to join us in Palm Springs, CA for this, and six other powerful sessions at TEDMED 2016.

We hope you’ll join us!

Update: TEDMED 2016 Sessions Announced!

What If? Logo

A simple question can unleash the imagination. At TEDMED, we believe that’s what it takes to spark widespread change. That’s why the TEDMED 2016 event theme is “What If?”. But, TEDMED 2016 isn’t simply about raising new questions–it’s about the important, creative conversations that follow.

If you look closely at this year’s event logo, you’ll notice that the question mark is comprised of a medley of punctuation marks that, considered together, represent rich dialogue full of questions, discovery, and possibilities. In the spirit of asking “What If?”, each of the seven sessions that drive the TEDMED 2016 stage program is grounded in a single, stimulating question. These questions will inspire our multidisciplinary community to engage in conversation and embrace the power of curiosity and collaboration.

We are delighted to share the sessions below:

 

Session1

What if social and environmental  factors are inextricably entwined, not just with the culture of health, but also with its outcomes? Where we are born, grow, live, work, and age– these circumstances can shape not only individual health, but the health of a community. But, that’s not where social determinants of health stop–there’s a whole social side to health we’re still discovering. Learn more…

 


 

Session2What if the outer edges of human experience could provide solutions to everyday challenges? Often, our mental constructs and perceived limitations hinder our search for inspiration. What if we made a point of venturing into the most unusual and unexpected places for answers? Learn more…

 


 

Session3

What if visionaries ruled the world? In a rapid-fire series of creative, short-form talks, dozens of inspiring health entrepreneurs will share how their ideas and innovations will change everything. We’ll be sharing more details about this session next week – stay tuned!

 


 

Session4

What if we could expose and confront invisible threats to health? It’s getting easier for us to monitor and keep track of our health data–but what about the influences on our health that we can’t (or won’t) see and measure? Learn more…

 


 

Session5What if we possess the knowledge to be the architects of our aging and (eventual) deaths? We’ve made significant strides in understanding exactly what happens to our bodies as we age. Might we master our bodies and soulful understanding of self to the point that we will determine the way we die? Learn more…

 


 

Session6

What if we re-examine the way we frame health challenges? Might this approach yield effective solutions to seemingly unsolvable problems? As Marcel Proust wrote, “The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes, but in having new eyes.” Learn more…

 


 

Session7

What if we found beauty while confronting difficult truths? As the adage goes, every cloud has a silver lining. Beauty in suffering may not be apparent at first, but what can happen when we stumble upon it and then share it with others? Learn more…

 


Once again, we are deeply grateful to this year’s Editorial Advisory Board and Research Scholars for dedicating their time, expertise, and wisdom to helping us designing this year’s stage program.

Over the next few weeks, we’ll be unveiling the incredible speakers, innovators, artists and performers who make up this year’s stage program. We’ll also be sharing more details about the event. To keep up with our announcements, please be sure to sign up for our newsletter and subscribe to the TEDMED blog.

We hope you’ll join us this November 30-December 2 in Palm Springs, CA. If you haven’t done so yet, be sure to register and secure your spot at TEDMED! If you have any questions, please email admissions@tedmed.com.

A Culture of Health Includes Everyone

This guest post is by Sam Vaughn, TEDMED 2015 speaker and Neighborhood Change Agent in the City of Richmond, California. You can watch Sam’s TEDMED talk here.

Sam Vaughn 2A person can have a healthy heart and diseased lungs, or a healthy brain and kidney failure. Would you consider that person healthy? Society is quite similar. Until we create a culture of health that is inclusive of all citizens, we cannot consider ourselves a healthy society. Thus, we cannot create a healthy society until we deal with issues of personal security, like crime and gun violence.

As I mention in my TEDMED talk, at the Office of Neighborhood Safety, we identify individuals who are most likely to be perpetrators or victims of gun violence. We work with them through a program called the Operation Peacemaker Fellowship, a seven-step process to help them become self- and socially-aware of their roles in society, and to affirm their God-given and Constitutional rights to happy, safe and successful lives. Perhaps most importantly, we meet and accept them where they are, with no judgement, and recognize the social, structural and strategic injustices that they have faced most of their lives. We challenge them to accept that, despite those injustices, they still have a responsibility to themselves, to their families, and to their communities to do better.

The first step of the Fellowship, and one that is vital to our success, is for us to build a relationship with these individuals. Most young people don’t care what you know until they know that you care. Once trust is established, we create a LifeMAP with them, helping them see that a different future is possible by showing the changes that others have made. We help them envision a future as bright and fulfilling as they can possibly imagine, and we connect them to resources and service providers that can help make that dream become a reality. We connect them to mentors and coaches, a group we call Elders, who are older successful men of color who have successfully made changes in their own lives, and are now reaching back to help others.

Vaughn Picture Request (1)
Sam Vaughn, Devone Boggan, and Fellows on a retreat at the Teotihuacan Pyramid of the Sun, Mexico City.

Additionally, in a step riddled with great risk but even greater reward, we take the Fellows on trips around the globe, to help them see how good life can possibly be and get them addicted to living. The catch to this amazing travel opportunity is that they must travel with someone from what would be considered a “rival community.” As they begin to see themselves, and the world they live in, in a different light, they start to see each other differently as well.

Because we believe hard work should be rewarded, we provide a stipend to our Fellows, a practice that is seen as controversial by some. Critics frequently disparage this, claiming that we are paying criminals not to commit crime. Let me counter that by saying that, when I was young, my parents would give me $5 for every “A” I got on my report card. Were they paying me to go to school? Absolutely not– they were rewarding me for working so hard. We aren’t paying these young men for what they aren’t doing. We are rewarding them for what they are doing.

Our final step is to introduce our Fellows to mainstream society and the workforce through subsidized employment. In this stage, they develop a strong work ethic, effective workplace communication and the skills of being a team player. Eventually, they become employable by their own means, without subsidy.

Frankly, our goal is to provide these individuals with what every young person in this country receives when they grow up in a healthy, nurturing community. We’ve been successful. Of those who have participated in our Fellowship, 94% are alive, 84% haven’t been injured by a firearm, and 79% have not been suspects in new firearm-related crimes. During the period of our interventions with these youth, the city of Richmond, California has experienced a 66% reduction in firearm assaults and a 55% reduction in firearm related homicides between 2007 and 2015. By attending to these young men who are and have been traditionally underserved and abandoned by the mainstream services platform, the City of Richmond is creating a culture of health in a once dangerous city that is today a much more desirable place to live, learn, work and play.  

Announcing TEDMED 2016: What if?

Tough-minded skeptics and visionary dreamers agree on one thing: if we are going to change our world for the better, we must first imagine new possibilities.

As children, we’re encouraged to ask questions and dream big. But, as we become adults, our imagination is tamed by perceived practicality and social conformity. What if we let ourselves ask creative questions again? Where might our search for answers lead?

 

Albert Einstein quote

 

We believe that human creativity and imagination are at the heart of scientific inquiry and medical discovery, and that progress begins with a single idea. That belief is what inspired this year’s theme:

 

What If? Logo

 

TEDMED 2016 is about asking questions, the importance of conversation and dreaming big. It’s about imagining the possibilities that motivate progress in health and medicine, which can be summed up in two simple but powerful words: “What If?”

We’ll explore questions like:
– What if we created beauty in response to life’s most difficult challenges?
– What if we expose and tackle invisible threats to health?
– What if we were the architects of aging?
– What if we treated pandemics as though we lived in a borderless world?
– What if health is determined not by how, but where, we live?

At TEDMED 2016, we will experience the unmatched power of asking “what if” in health and medicine. Our program will explore a range of topics including unique approaches to understanding increasing longevity, novel visualization techniques for medical education and clinical care, therapeutic uses of 3D printing, innovations in treating mental health, and creative ways to embrace our humanity. Click here to see the priority topics considered for the TEDMED 2016 program.

We’ll begin announcing this year’s lineup of speakers, performers and innovators in the coming weeks. We look forward to sharing more details with you, the TEDMED community.

Join us this November 30–December 2 in Palm Springs, CA, as we explore provocative and inspiring questions and discussions that drive us toward a healthier world. If you have any questions about attending, please email admissions@tedmed.com.

Taking a new look at psychedelics: Q&A with Roland Griffiths

At TEDMED 2015, psychopharmacology researcher Roland Griffiths shared intriguing research findings about psilocybin, a naturally occurring psychedelic substance that has been used for hundreds of years within some cultures for medical, healing, and religious purposes. We reached out to Roland with some questions about his current research.

We’re especially curious about your research into the connections between psilocybin, spirituality, and consciousness. Can you tell us more? Are there any updates?

_JHU9762 RRG office copy_FotorIn ongoing studies, we’re examining the effects of psilocybin in long-term meditators and in religious leaders from the major faith traditions. We’re also conducting two anonymous internet surveys. One is asking about experiences that some people report of an encounter with God, or the God of their understanding. Another is examining anomalous experiences, such as Near Death Experiences, that produce enduring changes in people’s attitudes and beliefs about death and dying. In both surveys, we want to compare spontaneously occurring experiences with psychedelically occasioned ones. Our hope is that these surveys will allow us to better understand such experiences and how they may differ across faith traditions and occasioning events (e.g. prayer, meditation, spontaneously-occurring, nature experiences, drug-occasioned, etc.).

Our research has shown that a single experience with psilocybin can produce personally meaningful experiences accompanied by enduring positive changes in attitudes, mood and behavior. We’ve recently completed a study suggesting that psilocybin decreases depression and anxiety associated with a life-threatening cancer diagnosis. We’re also following up on a pilot study that suggested the psilocybin may be helpful in treating drug addictions — in this case, cigarette smoking. Finally, we’re initiating a study to explore the efficacy of psilocybin for treatment-resistant depression. In several of our studies we are using fMRI brain imaging methods to examine the acute and persisting changes in brain function that occur after receiving psilocybin.

You’ve opened our eyes to the potential therapeutic benefits of psilocybin – but do they come with risks?

_JHU9895 cancer pamphlet copy_FotorAlthough most participants in our laboratory studies have positive psilocybin experiences, about 30% experience significant fear or anxiety sometime during the session. Even for that 30%, given our careful screening and support, persisting adverse outcomes are virtually non-existent. It can be a different story for haphazard use in the general population. We recently conducted an internet survey of almost 2000 people who described their single most challenging experiences after taking psilocybin. Almost 40% of respondents rated the experience to be among the five most challenging experiences of their lives (yet, curiously, often among the most meaningful of their lives). Notably, about 10 percent said they had put themselves or others at risk of physical harm during the challenging experience, most likely in response to fear or panic, and about 10% reported enduring adverse psychological symptoms lasting a year or more. The contrast between the survey results and the excellent safety track record of the laboratory studies underscores the need for careful screening, preparation, and support.

Why study mystical experiences? What does this work mean to you?

Many of the challenges facing the world today, such as the environmental crisis and hostilities within and between cultures, stem from a lack of appreciation for the profound interconnectedness of all people and all things. This sense of interconnectedness or unity is a core feature of the world’s ethical and moral systems. Our interconnectedness is also a core feature of the mystical or transcendent experiences that occur with high probability after the ingestion of psilocybin under appropriate conditions. Ultimately, systematic prospective study of mystical experiences and their consequences may be critical to the survival of our species and the healing of our planet.

Is there a thought or mantra that you repeat to yourself most often?

I try continually to cultivate deep gratitude for the astonishing mystery of consciousness — that we are aware that we are aware — giving rise in me to uplifting and sacred feelings of wonder about all that we do not and quite possibly can never know.

Watch Roland’s TEDMED 2015 talk, “The science of psilocybin and its use to relieve suffering,” here. 

 

Improving the script for caregiving

K&M PhotoboothIn this conversation between two improv actors, Mondy Carter steps into Karen Stobbe’s world and asks for her perspectives on what she thinks living with Alzheimer’s disease is like, and how we can harness the rules of improv to improve our caregiving.  Learn more about Karen and Mondy and watch their TEDMED 2015 talk here.

Mondy: Why do you think being in the moment with someone living with Alzheimer’s is important? I know what I think, but I am interested in how you see it.

Karen: People living with Alzheimer’s are experiencing short term memory loss. When you’re struggling to remember and trying to make sense of the world around you, life becomes very immediate – very  much in the now.  If we stay in the moment with them, it slows us down and brings us more into their world so we can see things from their perspective.

Mondy: That’s how I see your Mom’s experience with Alzheimer’s. You and I walk around with the context of our recent memories, and so the world makes sense to us. But her recent experiences don’t stay with her at all, and that void of information is filled with immediate sensations colored with the only memories that she does have – ones from long ago. Even though we can share the present, I have to be open to her particular present to be in the moment with her.

Karen: Exactly. When you are truly in the moment, you make yourself available to be present for any moment that arrives.

One of the hardest guidelines to follow in improv and Alzheimer’s is listening fully. To really understand a person with Alzheimer’s, I think you have to pretend the other person is the only one in the world as you listen to them. Like I do with you….

Mondy: You do? I must have missed that.

Karen: Perhaps if you listened more fully?

Mondy: Hmmm…sorry, I just got a text!

Karen: Ha. Seriously, though, think about how courageous it is to even try to communicate when you’re struggling to remember, fighting to follow a conversation, or piecing together fragments of memories to make sense of the world. If they are trying that hard, maybe we can try to be more present in our listening. There was actually a study done in nursing homes that showed 92% of the talking was done by those who work there, and only 8% by those who live there. Not a lot of conversations with the residents or listening by the staff is taking place.

Mondy: When I began improv, it was really difficult for me to stop working out my responses while the other players were talking. It’s hard to believe that just letting go of our own ideas allows us to come up with the best ideas. But, when you listen fully and have the other person foremost in your mind, the human brain is perfectly able to come up with what is needed immediately. Wouldn’t you say that listening is the bedrock of improvisation?

Karen: Yes. And isn’t listening something you have to actively practice?

Mondy: I had to, again and again. The “good” thing about doing improv on stage is that, when you don’t follow the guidelines, you fall on your face. There is a tremendous ego incentive to let go of your ego. If you don’t let go and listen, you crash and burn.

Karen: Which is basically what can happen in a caregiving situation.  If you don’t let go and listen, you won’t understand what the person with Alzheimer’s is trying to say. Misinterpreting their intentions or projecting our ideas can lead to frustration on both sides.

Mondy: Is that why so many people think aggression and anger are always a part of Alzheimer’s?

Karen: That’s a common misperception. People think everyone with Alzheimer’s gets to an “aggressive stage” or all “get angry.” That is not true. Most of those so-called behaviors are either their way of trying to communicate, or reactions to our poor behavior. Most of the time, their actions are really very normal for their perceived situation. We just don’t see it that way.

Mondy: Can you give me an example of that situation?

Karen: Imagine that it’s 6:00am and you’re comfortably lying in bed, in your home when… boom! A complete stranger walks in, opens your drapes and says, “Mr. Carter it’s time to get up!” How would you react?

Mondy: I would freak out and throw something at them. Do I have a taser in this hypothetical case?

Karen: Sure, there is a taser…

Mondy: Then I would tase them.

Karen: We do that to people living with Alzheimer’s all the time.

Mondy: We tase them?!

Karen: Ha! Stop it. No, we don’t bother asking them if they even have any desire to get up. We forget to re-introduce ourselves if we’ve been out of the room for a bit. We tell them they are in their room, but then we burst right in and order them around. In that situation, just about anyone would get upset or angry.

Mondy: I see. So that’s why stepping into their world, instead of forcing them to live in ours, is so important.

Karen: Yes – there’s so much we could learn from the basic rules of improv. Stepping into their world, being in the moment, and listening fully – these rules are the foundation of compassionate care for people living with Alzheimer’s.

JerodHarris_7127_Fotor

Crazy about CRISPR

This guest blog post is by Sam Sternberg, a TEDMED 2015 speaker. You can watch Sam’s TEDMED talk, “What if we could rewrite the human genome?”, here. 

This thing called CRISPR seems to be all over the news these days, whether as a miracle treatment to cure genetic disease, an eradication strategy to rid the Earth of mosquitoes (together with Zika virus and the malaria parasite), a weapon of mass destruction alongside North Korean nukes and Syrian chemical weapons, or the reproductive technology that will usher in an era of so-called designer babies. CRISPR was even featured in the recent comeback season of the X-files, in conjunction with aliens and a global pandemic. What could possibly unite all these divergent topics?

The common thread is DNA, and more specifically, an amazing new tool that makes editing DNA virtually as easy as the “find and replace” function in word processing software (check out this neat video for an animated explanation). Of course, scientists have had the ability to modify DNA in the laboratory for decades – even to synthesize entire microbial chromosomes from scratch. But using the CRISPR technology, it’s now possible to rewrite DNA inside living cells with the same kind of control and accuracy, and to tweak billion-letter genomes in almost every way imaginable: deleting genes, adding genes, inverting genes, repairing genes, even turning genes on or off. After three short years of research and development, scientists have been hard-pressed to find things that CRISPR can’t do.

shutterstock_353873630So what is CRISPR, anyway? Although the acronym alone won’t tell you much – CRISPR stands for clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats – the story behind these repeats, and how they came to revolutionize biology, is pretty cool. The short version: after first being detected in E. coli in 1987, CRISPR remained a complete mystery for nearly two decades, until scientists studying yogurt-producing bacteria realized it was a type of antiviral immune system. Subsequent research in flesh-eating bacteria not only revealed how CRISPR naturally worked, but also how it could be redesigned and repurposed for DNA editing in other organisms. (You can read more about some of the breakthrough discoveries here and here.)

After the first reports surfaced in 2013 demonstrating successful editing of the human genome, the CRISPR technology was rapidly applied to a huge number of plants and animals, everything from common model organisms like rice and mice to more exotic species like broccoli and butterflies. Meanwhile, labs all around the world began using CRISPR because of its low cost and easy implementation. Today, even ordinary online shoppers can order do-it-yourself CRISPR kits to edit DNA in the comforts of their own home.

Having spent my PhD years studying CRISPR in Jennifer Doudna’s laboratory, starting well before the technology exploded, I’ve been mesmerized by the myriad ways in which DNA editing is transforming biological research. After all, DNA contains the blueprints for all living things, and we now have total mastery over these blueprints, to alter them in virtually any way that suits our needs or fancies. Yet with this newfound power also comes a responsibility to use it safely, and ethically.

Should CRISPR be used to alter the human genome for generations to come, by editing DNA in fertilized embryos? To create genetically engineered designer pets, such as miniaturized pigs or extra-muscular dogs? Or to spread new traits like malaria resistance or female infertility into wild insect populations? By removing many of the technical barriers that previously limited attempts at DNA manipulation, CRISPR has changed the question facing society from “If we could do it, would we want to?” to, “Now that we can do it, should we?”

Scientists and a wide range of stakeholders have already begun tackling some of the issues raised by CRISPR, and governmental officials are quickly following suit. In the U.S., within the next year or so, we can expect the announcement of an updated system for the regulation of genetically modified products, and a comprehensive study outlining recommendations for the responsible use of gene editing in humans.

There are reasons to proceed cautiously and prudently. But I hope that – even with all the concern surrounding CRISPR – we don’t lose sight of the incredible possibilities. In a medical first, DNA editing saved the life of a one-year-old girl suffering from leukemia last fall, and that may be just the beginning. Whether as a tool to expose the vulnerabilities of cancer, a therapy for patients afflicted with HIV/AIDS, or a cure for muscular dystrophy and sickle cell anemia, CRISPR offers real promise to solve some of the world’s most challenging diseases. Let’s see what a few more years of research can achieve.

Overheard at TEDMED: Let’s Dance

Optimized-MichaelPainterThis guest blog post was written by Michael Painter, senior program officer and senior member of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Quality/Equality team.

Most have seen Derek Sivers’ 2010 TED talk, “How to start a movement.” In it a horde of dancers danced. That horde didn’t come out of nowhere of course. It started with a single nutty guy’s idea of a dance. Soon another joined, then more and more. Those two eventually became that dancing horde. Change—even big change—is like that dance. It starts small. An idea moves out of a mind into a conversation. Sometimes a small conversation, even over lunch, turns into a bigger one—a much bigger one.

At TEDMED 2015, TEDMED asked its community to dance about health. They asked each of us: what is your role in building a Culture of Health? Sure, we can agree on an ultimate far-off health goal for the country: everyone would have the hope, the means, and lots of opportunities to lead the healthiest lives possible. There are many (many) ways to get to that future. Some of those ideas can be remarkably different—most of them aren’t easy—but together they will help us create our Culture of Health dance.

TEDMED drove that conversation—that dance—with open-ended questions to spark powerful discussions about the role of health in our lives and communities. More than 800 TEDMED Delegates participated on-site, and over 150 contributed their perspectives online in response to thought-provoking questions like:

  • What is masquerading as health?
  • How can business positively impact society’s health?
  • Name one small shift that would make the biggest impact on health?
  • What is the secret to making health a shared value?

Blog post 4A dance floor is only as rich as its many wild dancers. The TEDMED team captured over 1,000 responses that reflected a range of diverse thoughts and insights from health care professionals, government officials, scientific researchers, entrepreneurs, journalists, bloggers, and more.

Blogpost3These TEDMED dancers pointed to barriers and opportunities that will help us all make health a shared value. For example, many questioned whether we have placed too much trust in technology and the latest health apps and gadgets, instead of focusing on building real-life social connections and trusting human relationships. Conversations also highlighted the importance of addressing social determinants (such as housing, discrimination and economic status), and debated whether the government should try to provide incentives for healthy behavior.

TEDMED saw some emerging themes in the Culture of Health dance, summarized in the attached piece. Take a look. See what you think. Help us keep the conversation going in your communities – both online (using the #CultureofHealth and #TEDMED hashtags) and off. We can absolutely build our healthy future—but only if we dance together. Is your toe tapping yet?