It’s smart to design simple: Q&A with Josh Stein

On the TEDMED stage, serial entrepreneur and CEO & Co-founder of AdhereTech Josh Stein shared what he’s learned about designing ‘smart’ devices and the internet of things as they relate to positively influencing patient behavior. We caught up with Josh to learn more.

The Internet of Medical Things
Connected Medical Devices Will Revolutionize Healthcare… If Patients Actually Use Them. Josh Stein at TEDMED2014. (Photo: Sandy Huffaker for TEDMED)

Why does the talk matter now? What impact do you hope the talk will have?

The Internet of Medical Things is going through a period of incredible growth, which is absolutely fantastic for patients! However, there’s an enormous design hurdle in regard to user adoption, and this hurdle is largely ignored. In short, there is too great a focus on what these devices can do, and not enough focus on how these devices will actually do it.

The Internet of Things, (IoT), or ‘smart’ devices, can be separated into two distinct categories: devices that users purchase and devices they don’t purchase.

Most IoT devices fall into the former category. Users will pay a lot of their own money for a gorgeous new smart phone, TV, or fitness tracker because these gadgets provide an immediate benefit to the user (they are awesome and fun to use). In these instances, consumers are willing to go through a reasonable set up and learning process for these devices.

In contrast, a large percentage of smart IoT medical devices actually fall into the latter category: users don’t buy these devices, and they are provided to users by a third party. This occurs because: 1) other parties subsidize these tools in order to improve patient outcomes and thereby decreasing overall costs or increasing revenue, 2) consumers typically don’t like to pay for medical devices, and 3) consumers typically don’t see a tangible immediate benefit from these devices.

The reason why this distinction is so important is that most smart medical devices are designed as if they fall into the former category, at least from a user-experience perspective, when they actually fall into the latter category. Thus, these smart med devices are designed as if patients will go through a long and complicated set up process to use said devices, when in reality the patient will not perform such tasks. Patients are simply expected to do way too much in order to use most smart med devices.

I shared this thought at TEDMED 2014 with the hope that this notion will resonate with other smart medical device creators. This could potentially lead to improved devices and better patient health.

What kind of meaningful or surprising connections did you make at TEDMED?

I met Jim Madara, the CEO of AMA; he and his team spoke about the innovative ways in which they are revolutionizing how medicine is taught. I met Marc Koska; his syringe is one of the most ingenious medical devices that I have ever seen. It solves a huge problem through simplicity and understanding its user. I built a relationship with an individual who is innovating clinical trials at one of the most innovative companies in healthcare. I don’t want to mention this person’s name because, though this introduction, my company is now planning an engagement with his incredible organization. Stay tuned for updates on this collaboration – we’ll keep TEDMED in the loop!

I also met one of my favorite stand-up comedians, Tig Notaro. Her TEDMED talk was awe-inspiring, and it was amazing to see a whole other side to her. I can’t say enough great things about her and her work!

I had the pleasure of speaking with Jay Walker. His wisdom and advice has directly impacted product and vision of my company. I genuinely attribute a great deal of our success to the conversations I’ve had with him.

What is the legacy you want to leave?

I want to be known as someone who has a net positive benefit on the world. Professionally, I believe I’m on the right track with the innovative work that my team and I are doing –  our product has been improving the adherence and outcomes of patients since 2013. We work long hours, but seeing improved patient health and traction continues to motivate us.