Overheard at TEDMED: Let’s Dance

Optimized-MichaelPainterThis guest blog post was written by Michael Painter, senior program officer and senior member of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Quality/Equality team.

Most have seen Derek Sivers’ 2010 TED talk, “How to start a movement.” In it a horde of dancers danced. That horde didn’t come out of nowhere of course. It started with a single nutty guy’s idea of a dance. Soon another joined, then more and more. Those two eventually became that dancing horde. Change—even big change—is like that dance. It starts small. An idea moves out of a mind into a conversation. Sometimes a small conversation, even over lunch, turns into a bigger one—a much bigger one.

At TEDMED 2015, TEDMED asked its community to dance about health. They asked each of us: what is your role in building a Culture of Health? Sure, we can agree on an ultimate far-off health goal for the country: everyone would have the hope, the means, and lots of opportunities to lead the healthiest lives possible. There are many (many) ways to get to that future. Some of those ideas can be remarkably different—most of them aren’t easy—but together they will help us create our Culture of Health dance.

TEDMED drove that conversation—that dance—with open-ended questions to spark powerful discussions about the role of health in our lives and communities. More than 800 TEDMED Delegates participated on-site, and over 150 contributed their perspectives online in response to thought-provoking questions like:

  • What is masquerading as health?
  • How can business positively impact society’s health?
  • Name one small shift that would make the biggest impact on health?
  • What is the secret to making health a shared value?

Blog post 4A dance floor is only as rich as its many wild dancers. The TEDMED team captured over 1,000 responses that reflected a range of diverse thoughts and insights from health care professionals, government officials, scientific researchers, entrepreneurs, journalists, bloggers, and more.

Blogpost3These TEDMED dancers pointed to barriers and opportunities that will help us all make health a shared value. For example, many questioned whether we have placed too much trust in technology and the latest health apps and gadgets, instead of focusing on building real-life social connections and trusting human relationships. Conversations also highlighted the importance of addressing social determinants (such as housing, discrimination and economic status), and debated whether the government should try to provide incentives for healthy behavior.

TEDMED saw some emerging themes in the Culture of Health dance, summarized in the attached piece. Take a look. See what you think. Help us keep the conversation going in your communities – both online (using the #CultureofHealth and #TEDMED hashtags) and off. We can absolutely build our healthy future—but only if we dance together. Is your toe tapping yet?