Q&A with Dr. Farida, Aleppo First Responder

Dr. Farida, an OB/GYN, was the last remaining female obstetrician in besieged east Aleppo, Syria. She studied medicine at Aleppo University and worked primarily at the largest trauma facility in East Aleppo, M2, which was supported by the Syrian American Medical Society (SAMS). During the siege she performed procedures under extreme conditions, even completing a cesarean section in the midst of a chemical attack on her hospital. In December, she and her family were displaced from Aleppo and settled in Idlib province, where she currently works in a SAMS hospital. Dr. Farida played an instrumental role in training midwives and nurses in response to the shortage of medical personnel in besieged Aleppo, and has continued this work by designing curriculum’s for new education programs and advocating for international support for nursing and midwife schools. She spoke at TEDMED 2017, and you can watch her Talk here.


TEDMED: In your TEDMED interview with Leila Fadel you gave us a look into your life working as the only female obstetrician in Aleppo during a time of siege. You tried to stay in Aleppo, your hometown, but the regime took control of the city and you were forced to leave. Can you tell us about what life is like today for you and your family and what has changed since we last heard from you?

Dr. Farida: I can summarize this question with one word loneliness—away from my home, dreams, family, and memories.

TM: You spoke about the obligation you feel to stay in Syria and to help as many people as you can. Your bravery and strength are inspiring. What advice do you have for the next generation of doctors in Syria and other war-torn countries?

DF: Please don’t leave poor people alone without medical care, in this way you’ll give the opportunity for deceivers to hurt and cheat innocent people, and that is what is happening now in Syria.

“This photo is of triplets born yesterday in my hospital. They are premature and need a special medication that doesn’t exist in northern Syria. They are so sick and I hope they’ll survive.” — Dr. Farida

TM: What do you think that health workers—especially gynecologists and midwives—from around the world can learn from your story of providing care in Aleppo?

DF: When you are alone in your battle, many people will hurt you, trying to disable your power, you should not care, and instead go on to satisfy your conscience, not the people.

TM: In your interview, you talk about what Aleppo and other areas of war could use from the global community. Has anything improved on this front in the past year? What are the most pressing needs today?

DF: Unfortunately, the medical situation is going worse, the number of doctors is declining day after day, comparable to the increasing number of evicted.

TM: What was the TEDMED experience like for you?

DF: The TEDMED team is so good and hardworking, and I was surprised when I knew the number of the team (just 7)!!! The team members gave me self confidence and made me feel like a superwoman. TEDMED encouraged me to continue my exhausting job in Syria in spite of hopeless and depressive moments.