What Home Means to Health

As the WHO explains, individual and community health is driven by a variety of factors including the “social and economic environment, the physical environment, and an individual’s behaviors and characteristics”. Only when a person’s social and physical environments are taken into account can we address his or her full health profile from a comprehensive and holistic perspective. This year, we will hear from Speakers and Hive Innovators who are digging into these critical social and environmental factors as a means to improve health.

Miners in Appalachia began the process of mountaintop removal (MTR) coal mining—literally blowing off the tops of mountains—in order to access coal with lower sulfur content. While this type of surface mining holds fewer health risks for miners, the health implications for people living in close proximity to MTR locations had long been unknown. After moving to West Virginia, Professor Michael Hendryx became fascinated by this process of coal extraction and began to study the relationship between mountaintop removal coal mining and the health of people in nearby communities. He discovered an independent correlation between poor health outcomes and proximity to MTR sites, likely due to increased levels of the toxicant crystalline silica (a known contributor to lung cancer that is released from coal). Michael’s findings have been met with strong political resistance, perhaps, in part, because they are based on correlations, rather than causation. As he works to establish direct connections between environmental effects and physical health, mountaintop removal coal mining continues to take place, unleashing salts and trace minerals into the air and nearby mountain streams. Michael is hopeful that his research will encourage policymakers to consider the full picture when assessing the environmental impacts of any energy source.

Like Michael, Sara Vander Zanden of The BLOCK Project recognizes that where someone lives greatly contributes to their health. The BLOCK Project presents a new solution to homelessness, encouraging communities to place a BLOCK Home in the backyard of a single-family home on residentially-zoned blocks in Seattle, Washington. Their artfully designed 125-square-feet homes are off the grid and equipped with a kitchen, bathroom, sleeping area, composting toilet, greywater system, and solar-panels. The BLOCK Project aims to “offer opportunities for healing and advancement to those formerly living on the fringes of society” by fostering connection and community relationships, halting the emotional and physical separation that coincides with the social injustice of homelessness.

A BLOCK Project home, designed by BLOCK Architects.

Surprisingly, our physical environment’s impact on our health starts as early as in our first home—the womb. In her research, neuroscientist Jill Goldstein explores the impact of a fetus’s physical environment on the prenatal development of the brain. Jill’s research has identified that prenatal disruptions (such as a traumatic experience or chronic stress) for a pregnant mother can impact her developing fetus’s brain circuitry. These changes in circuitry can predispose the fetus to certain chronic diseases—such as depression or CVD—years down the line. Stressful external circumstances—such as living in socioeconomically disadvantaged areas—can be physiologically internalized and not only affect an expectant mother’s well being, but also that of her unborn baby.

As these Speakers and Hive Innovators show, addressing the influences of our social and physical surroundings can improve health outcomes beyond the limits of our previous understanding. We’re excited to showcase these individuals and their game-changing work at TEDMED 2017—and we hope that you’ll join us.

We shouldn’t wait for child sexual abuse to occur before we act to prevent it

Written and submitted by Elizabeth Letourneau.

Elizabeth is the inaugural director of the Moore Center for the Prevention of Child Sexual Abuse and Professor at the Department of Mental Health at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and is a past president for the Association for the Treatment of Sexual Abusers. Elizabeth spoke on the TEDMED stage in 2016, and you can watch her talk here.


Child sexual abuse is a preventable problem that causes needless suffering and harm. We can prevent it, yet we wait before we intervene, usually acting only after harm has occurred. Most cases of child sexual abuse – about 80% – occur in someone’s home while nearly 20% take place in institutions, including schools, camps, religious facilities, foster care and other youth-serving settings. In rare instances, abuse occurs in public spaces such as parks or shopping malls. Different settings offer different challenges and opportunities for prevention. Likewise, people who engage in harmful sexual behavior with children do so for a variety of reasons.

It’s not widely known that children and adolescents account for as many as half of all sexual offenses against young children. They may be acting impulsively, acting out their own abuse, or experimenting with age-inappropriate partners. Many simply may not know that engaging younger children in sexual behavior is harmful. Likewise adult offenders engage in these behaviors for many reasons. Different prevention programs and policies are needed to address the different factors that influence child sexual abuse.

To a large degree, our nation has ignored prevention in favor of after-the-fact interventions that focus on mandated reporting and criminal justice sanctions. When we have focused on prevention, it has been with school-based programs that attempt to train children to distinguish between good and bad touches. Yet no single approach can possibly be sufficient. What is needed – what is long overdue – is a comprehensive public health approach to the prevention of child sexual abuse.

We do not need to start from scratch to develop a national public health approach to child sexual abuse. Many youth-serving organizations already mandate child sexual abuse prevention training for staff and volunteers. We can look to them for good and promising practices. For example, Boy Scouts of America requires two adults to be present for all interactions with children. Likewise, training programs have been developed by organizations such as Stop It Now! and Darkness 2 Light to help parents, teachers, and child care workers detect and intervene in child sexual abuse. Essential to these and other efforts is empirical evaluation to determine their effectiveness. We would not release a vaccine without rigorous testing, and we should not broadly disseminate prevention practices unless and until we are certain they do the job of preventing sexual abuse against children.

A comprehensive public health approach will bring needed empirical rigor to this field and will help us expand prevention efforts to – for example – deter children, adolescents, and adults from engaging in abusive behaviors in the first place. As I discuss in my TEDMED Talk, we have begun to make exciting progress in this area.

A public health approach will also help us to move beyond focusing solely on the behavior of individuals to focusing on prevention at the community level, including design and messaging. For example, the Boys and Girls Clubs of America have invested deeply in identifying structural changes to their buildings that might reduce the risk of child sexual abuse. Some of their efforts, such as placing windows in all interior doors, increase the visibility of adult-child interactions. Does making such interactions more visible and “interruptible” discourage abusive behavior? Perhaps. But before we recommend that everyone remodel their buildings, it would be prudent to gather some data. The YMCA is looking into the use of creative signage to see if these can impact the behavior of adults towards children. Wouldn’t it be amazing if architects, structural engineers, and designers helped us solve the problem of child sexual abuse? The public health approach encourages such multidisciplinary collaborations.

There are no doubt myriad ways to effectively prevent child sexual abuse just waiting to be found. But we need the will to put significant resources into designing and testing these before-the-fact interventions. What we’ve been doing for the past 30 years – teaching our children how to protect themselves, mandating teachers and others to report abuse, and relying on law enforcement strategies – just isn’t enough. We can do much better. We can develop and fund a national public health prevention program to keep children safe from sexual abuse.

The Healing Power of Art

Art exposes us to new ideas and people we may never otherwise meet, allowing us to have unique emotional experiences and to feel connected to one another. It promotes dialogue and creates a platform for us to share experiences and ideas. Research shows that the simple act of engaging with art is connected to positive health outcomes, such as reduced stress and anxiety.

TEDMED has long celebrated this connection between art and health. For example, in 2015, creative art therapist Melissa Walker took our stage to share how she engages patients with traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder through making masks, giving service members a non-threatening platform to unravel their stories and unlock their emotions. And, last year, artist and patient advocate Ted Meyer shared his story and showcased his 18-year project Scarred for Life which chronicles the trauma and courage of people who have lived through accidents and health crises.

This year at TEDMED, we will hear from two artists who use their artistic talents to communicate stories about themselves and their communities. By sharing personal experiences of loss and healing, and depicting the emotional experiences of entire communities, these two artists are using are promoting well-being through their unique artistic outlets.

For cellist Zoë Keating, music has always been a means of risk-taking and personal expression. With her husband’s encouragement, Zoë gained the confidence to conquer intense stage fright and to pursue a professional career in music after spending several years in the tech world as an information architect. When her husband was diagnosed with stage IV non-smoker’s lung cancer, Zoë’s story pivoted and she took on another role—that of the caregiver. She paused her career to care for her husband and their young son, documenting their family’s experience navigating the complicated US health care system and their insurance battles on her music blog. After her husband died, Zoë coped and communicated through her music.

Zoë describes her music as a lifeline—a way for her to rebuild her world after loss and move forward. Scientific research has reinforced the healing power of music: researchers have found that music is intertwined with our experiences, creating musical and emotional memories which we can unlock to promote healing and recovery. For example, patients with brain injuries may be unable to talk, but are able to use singing as a starting point—propelling them on the path to regaining speech. Zoë remains an advocate for patients like her husband and continues to perform original songs influenced by her experiences and emotions. Each piece of music she performs is a story that brings her closer to her audiences than ever before.

Like Zoë, Artist Jennifer Chenoweth has experienced personal trauma and found healing through her art. Growing up, Jennifer faced physical and emotional challenges, and art provided her with an outlet and a community that she says helped lead her on a path to wholeness. Jennifer describes art as the “door to stories,” and through her XYZ Atlas project, she uses art as a way to explore how experiences create a sense of belonging and why we become emotionally attached to certain places.

Jennifer Chenoweth’s Hedonic map of Austin

By correlating psychologist Robert Plutchik’s wheel of emotions to a color wheel and using hundreds of anonymous responses to a survey about where individual emotional experiences have occurred, Jennifer created a “hedonic map” of her hometown Austin, Texas. The National Endowment for the Arts uses similar techniques to provide healing experiences for military veterans. The idea behind this program is that creative platforms help both patients and providers gain a more coherent understanding of the patient’s underlying status, making “invisible wounds” more visible and readily addressed. Jennifer sees emotion as a surrogate for health status. Her maps allow her to visually demonstrate both the disparities and commonalities of individuals in the community, providing lessons of compassion and connectedness.

TEDMED has always championed the role of art in health and its potential to promote well-being, whether by simply using exposure to uplifting art to expedite the healing of patients in the hospital or by creating a new platform to evaluate our communities and promote dialogue. These Speakers are making the invisible visible, and facilitating new ways for us to embrace our connectedness.

Challenging the drug development status quo

Written and submitted by Sharon Terry

This guest blog post is by Sharon Terry, President and CEO of Genetic Alliance and Founding CEO of PXE International. Sharon spoke on the TEDMED stage in 2016, and you can watch her talk here.


We are told frequently that we’re fortunate to live in a new golden age of medicine, that advances taking place in genomic research, immunology and other biomedical research fields are bringing us closer to a horizon that will see more effective treatments and even cures for the diseases that have plagued humankind for generations.

And yet, the reality, to this point, is somewhat less glowing than the sales pitch. A study cited in the New York Times found that we’re spending more money than ever on drug development with fewer positive results to show for it. The study found that, for every billion dollars spent on pharmaceutical research and development since 1950, the number of new drugs reaching the marketplace has fallen every nine years by roughly half. So, we remain in a state in which there are thousands of diseases, but only hundreds have treatments.

There are a number of reasons to which we can point for this declining productivity in the drug development pipeline, from the higher costs of conducting clinical trials to the need for Food and Drug Administration reforms. From my own experience, however, I would strongly suggest that the biomedical research infrastructure needs to take a hard look at itself and ask, first, whether a hypercompetitive, non-collaborative approach to biopharmaceutical science is conducive to achieving optimal progress and, second, why it is not actively engaging some of its most valuable resources—patients and family members.

In my 2016 TEDMED talk, I discuss my family’s personal experiences with the medical research community after my two children were diagnosed with PXE, a rare genetic disorder that results in a slow advance of premature aging. After the diagnosis, we were contacted by researchers asking for blood samples for a research project focused on identifying the gene that causes PXE. Only two days later, another research center also wanted blood samples. Not wanting my young children to be stuck with needles twice, I asked if they could share the samples taken by their Boston counterparts. They looked at me as if I was suggesting using leeches and spells to cure this disease.

That’s when we realized that the world of biomedical research is an alien landscape to those of us who are unfortunate enough to be dependent on it. There is intense competition between scientists and academic institutions. Ok, I know that competition can generate great progress in an economic paradigm. But, in academic research, where information is critical to medical breakthroughs, and tax payer dollars are supporting the work, the hoarding of data in order to get more funding, more published articles, a better tenure track, and faster promotions is antithetical to what we need for our, and our children’s, health and wellbeing.

This experience also drove home the “us versus them” nature of researchers’ relationships with research participants and their families. There is a great deal of conversation and rhetoric around participant and patient engagement. In most cases, though, that phraseology is often code for recruiting more clinical trial participants to increase sample sizes. In seeing patients only as data points instead of true partners, biomedical researchers are missing a key opportunity to advance and accelerate their work.

My organization Genetic Alliance, in partnership with Private Access, is putting this theory into practice through an undertaking called Platform for Engaging Everyone Responsibly (PEER). The individuals participating in PEER are much more than statistics in a limited disease silo. They share health information and “patient reported outcomes,” from their lived experience, which warrant attention and resource commitment. In one example, we’ve worked closely with a number of sickle-cell patient advocacy organizations, learning from individuals about the aspects of the condition that matter most to them. Combining this with socioeconomic data, we were able to provide the FDA—for its patient-focused drug development program—valuable data from individuals who can’t come to Washington, DC for a hearing, and who are unlikely to use the agency’s web-based system to record comments.

This effort to better engage patients as true experts, is an initiative for which we should have the support of the full biomedical research establishment, instead of resistance. Too many times the experience of people living with a condition is dismissed or overlooked. There should not be an “us versus them” dynamic to pursuing treatments and cures. It remains, since my children were first diagnosed with PXE in 1994, a mystery as to why we’re not all in this together, pulling in the same direction.

It is clear that the status quo, when it comes to drug development, is not working. What will it take for us to wake up and realize that individuals and their families are not only demanding a change, but we’re leading the way to change.

Food can fix it! – A non-foodie´s journey to save the world, starting at the plate

Written and submitted by Gunhild Stordalen

This guest blog post is by Gunhild Stordalen, co-founder of The Stordalen Foundation and initiator of the Eat Forum. Gunhild spoke on the TEDMED stage in 2016, and you can watch her talk here.


I am an environmentalist at heart, but a medical doctor by education. Life takes some strange turns sometimes, and in 2009 I found myself serving on the board of one of Scandinavia´s largest hotel companies. There, I started looking for ways to reduce the hotel´s environmental impact as well as to improve the health of guests and employees. Quickly, my eyes focused on food.

Photo credit: Linus Sundahl-Djerf
Gunhild and EAT have hosted several events during the UN General Assembly. In 2016 they led a discussion on urban food systems. Learn more here.

In an average hotel, food and drinks account for as much as 70% of the environmental footprint. Additionally, what we put on hotel restaurant menus can have a huge impact on human health. My question was therefore: “What food could we serve that would be healthier for people, better for the climate and better for the environment?”

I searched the literature, read reports and called experts everywhere. I found lots of papers published on health and nutrition, climate-smart agriculture, organic food and biodiversity. But I found literally nothing that could answer my simple question: “What types of food are both healthy and environmentally sustainable?”

Not being able to find a healthy and sustainable menu solution for some 190 Nordic hotels was quite frustrating. But the fact that no one had the answer for how to sustainably feed a healthy diet to our growing population was straight up shocking!

What we eat and how we produce it is already causing some of our greatest health and environmental challenges. While almost 800 million people are getting too little food, more than 2 billion are getting too much, which causes them to become either overweight or obese. Another 2 billion people suffer from micronutrient deficiencies. Increasingly, poor diets are posing a bigger threat to global health than tobacco, alcohol and drugs.

At the same time, the agricultural sector is the single biggest driver of both climate change and environmental degradation. It causes more than 30% of the planet’s loss in biodiversity and consumes 70% of the world´s fresh water. The meat industry alone is responsible for more greenhouse gas emissions than all the world´s cars, planes and ships combined. And, around one third of all food we produce is either lost or wasted.

Today, we produce enough calories to feed everyone, but those calories are unequally distributed and hugely inefficient. With business as usual, current population growth and diets trend toward more meat and animal-sourced foods; feeding the world’s population will mean increasing food production 50% by 2050.

There is no way we will reach the Paris Climate Agreement or the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals without a radical shift in the way we eat and produce our food. Getting it right on food is our great opportunity to get a lot right for both the health of people and the planet.

In 2013, I founded the EAT initiative with professor Johan Rockstrom and the Stockholm Resilience Center as our main academic partner. Last year, British research charity Wellcome Trust joined us, and together we established EAT Foundation. Gathering international leaders from science, politics, business and civil society, EAT is a global platform that aims to help speed up food systems transformation. Through our partnerships and collaborations, we create pathways and measures to make healthy and sustainable food choices accessible, affordable and convenient—for everybody, everywhere.

Photo credit: Linus Sundahl Djer
The EAT Stockholm Food Forum gathers leaders from science, business, politics and civil society, including chefs and activists. At last year´s conference, Jamie Oliver and Gunhild joined forces to get more food professionals involved in a healthy and sustainable food revolution.

I am a hard-core optimist. Even more so after seeing the rapidly growing awareness on the interlinkages between food, health and sustainability challenges in just these four years since I started EAT. I meet business leaders, investors, politicians, UN agencies and consumer organizations that are all ready for change, and I am thrilled to see healthy, green initiatives and innovations popping up everywhere!

Together, we can fix the food system! Of course, significant work still remains, from setting science-based targets to creating coherent policies, and in implementing new business models that are “all good” and not only “less bad”. But right now, the bottlenecks are not lack of evidence, lack of political will or lack of technology. The main obstacles are lack of collaboration and co-creation. I started EAT to connect the dots. That’s why I am proud to work with leaders and game-changers that work together for a healthier, happier and more prosperous future for all.

I´ve never been a foodie. To be honest, I can hardly cook. But I love food because it represents the closest thing we will get to a silver bullet for healthy people on a healthy planet. Whether you are the most powerful man in the world, sit on the board of a hotel chain or you simply prepare dinners for your family and friends, we all have a role to play. What better way to bring people together for a better world than over great food!

The Hovalin: A real-time synesthesia translator

Written and submitted by Kaitlyn Hova

This guest blog post is by Kaitlyn Hova. Kaitlyn is a professional violinist, composer, full stack web developer, designer, neuroscientist, and core team member of Women Who Code. She is also a synesthete—which means her sensory perception is quite different from what most people experience. Kaitlyn spoke on the TEDMED stage in 2016, and you can watch her talk here.


Most people don’t expect their understanding of the senses to drastically change beyond what we learn in grade school: sight, smell, touch, taste, and hearing. I was 21 years old when I made the jarring discovery that none of my fellow students experienced vivid colors and shapes when they heard musical notes. At first, my classmates called this ability “weird”. Actually, I later learned the official term: “synesthesia”! Finding out that you physically experience the world in such a fundamentally different way can feel isolating. However, it turns out that 1 out of 23 people have some type of synesthesia. What if the study of this ability that was once thought to be “strange” is actually the study of the diversity of the average human sensory experience?

Matt and Kaitlyn Hova, co-founders of Hova Labs

I had always wanted to find a way to accurately convey my experience of seeing sound. I believed that if people could see a simulation of my synesthesia in real time they would be able to make the jump to understanding the nature of it. With this idea in mind, my husband Matt and I co-founded Hova Labs three years ago. One of our first projects was creating a real-time sound → color synesthesia translator violin. Imagine a guitar tuner, but instead of the tuner showing the note “C” it shows what I see when I hear the note “C”, which is the color red. Further, imagine that the brightness of the color is driven by the volume of the instrument being played. (I should be clear, the colors that I experience when I hear notes of music are an experience that is unique to me. If we both hear the note “C” and you see blue but I see red, neither of us is “wrong”, we simply have different associations in our brain.)

Creating a synesthesia-translating violin wasn’t easy—it took us a year and a half of prototyping. We could have easily just strapped LEDs on any violin but we had a VISION: a synesthesia translator glowing violin. First, in order to figure out how to drive the lights inside of our violin, I created a color-coded map of a piano. Additionally, we knew we wanted the violin holding the synesthesia-driven lights inside of it to be translucent, yet at the time (2014), such an instrument didn’t exist (or if it did, it was probably way too expensive). Determined to make our vision a reality, we decided to take our concept a step further. We created The Hovalin: our 3D printable acoustic violin.

Piano keys through the eyes and ears of synesthete Kaitlyn Hova

In October of 2015, we released the Hovalin, and we made it available for anyone to download online along with a short shopping list of materials and “how-to” build instructions. Since the launch, we’ve continued to improve the design. You can see me playing our v3.1 design in my TEDMED talk!

After launching the Hovalin, we soon realized that our project had the potential to be a lot larger than we originally thought. Though today’s music education programs are systematically underfunded, STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) grants are introducing 3D printers to kids at these same schools. We saw this as an opportunity: why not 3D print your music program?

Creating instruments with 3D printers is a solution that has never existed before. Today, all of the files are available to download for free at hovalin.com. If you have access to a consumer-level 3D printer, the total cost (including plastic, tuning pegs, strings, and bow) is $65. And this is just for one violin. With bulk purchases, we believe that this cost could be reduced drastically.

We already have a pilot program in Oakland, California, and we hope to expand to more schools around the country and the world. We believe that STEM programs can empower kids to solve their problems creatively while supporting the often under-funded music education programs in schools. We attribute our diverse backgrounds in music and tech to creating the Hovalin, and who knows what other great projects will come from kids that are given the chance to think creatively with STEM programs.

If you’re interested in learning more about Synesthesia, I encourage you to check out The Synesthesia Network. Also, you can check out more nerdy violin electronics in this blog post at Hova Labs.

The 21 Million

Written and submitted by Emtithal Mahmoud

This guest blog post is by Emtithal “Emi” Mahmoud, the reigning 2015 Individual World Poetry Slam Champion and 2016 Woman of the World Co-champion. Emi spoke on the TEDMED stage in 2016, and you can watch her talk here.


My grandmother, Nammah, never learned to read or write—where we came from, girls were forbidden from doing so. In May of 2016 I, her granddaughter, surrounded by friends and family, graduated from Yale University and closed the ceremony with something I, a woman, had written. But a number of factors had to fall in place before my family was able to reach that point.

Nearly 19 years before then, my mother, father, younger sister, and I had boarded a plane in Yemen, green cards in hand, after having left Sudan for safety well before. At the time, my father, a surgeon, and my mother, a medical lab technician, were exactly the kind of people history likes to laud as proof that immigrants are capable of incredible things—testaments to the triumph of humanity in the face of adversity. However, this valuing inherently comes at a cost, as if achievements represent human worth.

2 IDP women
Photo credit: Afaq Mahmoud, 2017
Two internationally displaced people speaking on women’s rights and how the war affects women, specifically focusing on the importance of education. Many women in the camps understand the necessity of their role in finding a way forward. Their names have been excluded for protection.

Today especially, with more than 65 million people displaced worldwide, 21 million of whom have become refugees, we often point to the attractive accomplishments of a select few as proof that refugees are worth saving and reduce the rest to a series of numbers.

What this focus on value or inherent worth suggests: in today’s world, if I and my grandmother were both contemporaries seeking refuge, I would be deemed worth the humanity, and she, a woman ultimately responsible for my entire existence, would not. What’s more, with recent policies, my family and I—even with the credentials that once could save us—would have been turned away once for Sudan, the country we were born in, and again for Yemen, the country in which we initially sought refuge. Together, our entire family would be seen as another component of the 21 million.

Loss is deeply personal, and yet we see it on a global scale almost every day. When this happens we become desensitized. Reversing that process and putting people back in front of the numbers is incredibly difficult, but incredibly necessary. This is precisely why I and we must speak of the individuals entrenched in the conflicts front and center in our world and not of their future success or earning potential. The most valuable thing we will miss is human life. There’s still so much to be done for all my sisters who will not have the same opportunity to prosper, or on even the most basic level, to survive.

Young student at Zamzam refugee camp school
Photo credit: Afaq Mahmoud, 2017
A young student at Zamzam refugee camp school in Northern Darfur. The photo was taken two weeks after an attack on Zamzam camp in 2015. In the absence of resources, the school depends solely on the work of volunteers, and its students and teachers live in constant fear of impending attacks.

I am often asked how it is that I stand by my identity and why I write and speak with conviction, despite the ramifications that may come with being a young, black, American, Afro-Arab, Muslim, woman. I often answer that it is because of my grandmother and the sacrifices that she and people like her have made and continue to make. I speak because my grandmother did not get the chance to and I am not alone. Earlier this year I joined the How to Do Good speaking tour with a series of incredible philanthropists and activists (including Fredi Kanouté, former West Ham United, Tottenham Hotspur and Sevilla striker and founder of Sakina Children’s Village, and Dr. Rouba Mhaissen, an economist and activist featured in Forbes 2017 30 Under 30, and the founder of SAWA) and we’ve made it our mission to inspire positive action. This initiative, and so many like it, is exactly what we need to reignite empathy in a world that seems to have lost it.

Infant receiving medical treatment
Photo credit: Afaq Mahmoud, 2017
An infant receiving treatment at Zamzam refugee camp in Northern Darfur. The medicine she requires isn’t readily available in the remote region.

I believe that when we are spoken to politically, we are compelled to respond politically, when we are spoken to academically, we are compelled to respond academically, when we are spoken to with hate, we are compelled to respond with hate; but when we are spoken to as human beings, we are compelled to respond with our humanity. In this global moment with endless pressing questions and not many daring to answer them, my challenge to you is to respond with your own humanity.

Visit Emi on Facebook to learn more about her latest work.

Engage with RWJF at TEDMED 2016

Last year at TEDMED, we kicked-off a conversation with our partner, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), around building a Culture of Health – a movement to improve the health and well-being of everyone in img_2000America. Our discussion last year focused on Making Health a Shared Value, one action area of the RWJF Culture of Health Framework, and this year we’re excited to explore another action area – Creating Healthier, More Equitable Communities. This conversation will be inspired by your perspective and input about what makes your communities – the places where you live, work, learn, and play – healthy, and the role we can all play in making them healthier, and more equitable.

From now throughout TEDMED 2016 and beyond, we look forward to creatively exploring RWJF’s 2016 TEDMED What If? question: “What if we valued our community’s health as much as our own?”

We’ll start this conversation with a pre-event #healthycommunities social media campaign – so join us on Twitter @TEDMED and @RWJF to share your thoughts about the importance of #healthycommunities and pictures of healthy places in your own community. We’re starting today, so look for these prompts and share your responses – we’ll incorporate them into an installation in The Hive onsite in Palm Springs!

How could grocery stores better support a Culture of Health? #healthycommunities

How would you reimagine playgrounds to build a Culture of Health? #healthycommunities

How could parking lots be used to create #healthycommunities?

How can transportation policy better support #healthycommunities?

Also, stay tuned for a ten-part Blog Series, curated by RWJF, showcasing the real and tangible ways that communities around the country are implementing programs focused on health and equity. Featuring each of the seven RWJF 2016 Culture of Health Prize winning communities, and several guest posts from TEDMED community members, this series is sure to inspire us all to improve the health and equity of our own communities.

img_2011Continuing what we hope is a robust and dynamic conversation and engagement on-line leading up to TEDMED, a Creating Healthier, More Equitable Communities Lunch will take place in Palm Springs on Thursday, December 1st. Over lunch, the entire TEDMED Delegation will gather as a community to explore programs, activities and policies that play a vital role in creating healthier, more equitable communities and help to build a Culture of Health around the country.

We can’t wait to hear from you and learn about the big and small ways that you are improving the health and equity of your community!

What is Culinary Medicine? Q&A with John La Puma

Nutrition specialist, chef, author, and practicing physician John La Puma lives and works on an organic farm in California. He makes his garbanzo guacamole recipe on the TEDMED stage while sharing his philosophy that the food we eat is as important as the pills we take, a key component of preventive health and our well being.  On the TEDMED Blog, John elaborates on culinary medicine and what role patients may have taking charge of their health and even educating their physicians about how to consider nutrition as part of the treatment plan.

John La Puma on culinary medicine
“Food is the most important healthcare intervention we have against chronic disease.” John La Puma, TEDMED 2014. Photo: Jerod Harris for TEDMED.

Why does this talk matter now?

Patients who ask their doctors, “What should I eat for my condition?” really want answers. Meanwhile, clinicians are clamoring for more and better information and training on nutrition. Culinary medicine is a new evidence-based field in medicine that blends the art of food and cooking with the science of medicine to yield high-quality meals and beverages which aim to improve the patient’s condition. It is already being taught in both undergraduate and postgraduate medical education.

What impact do you hope the talk will have?

I hope that the talk will help accelerate the cultural shift in healthcare towards wellness and well-being as primary goals in medicine. People need to know that some physicians care deeply about helping them become well with what they eat.

What is the legacy you want to leave?

Our mission is to inspire health-conscious consumers to look, feel and actually be measurably healthier by what they eat. The opportunity to use culinary medicine to prevent and treat disease is substantial, and culinary medicine should be considered as part of both the medical history and treatment plan in medicine.

How would medicine change if your ideas become reality?

All clinicians should be able to write culinary medicine prescriptions and know how food, like medicine, works in the body. I’d like to see condition-specific food and lifestyle measures become something that clinicians can offer, effectively, before prescription medication for most chronic conditions.

What is your core belief about culinary medicine?

Everyone has a right to clean, healthful, delicious, real food that both satisfies their appetite and makes or keeps them well…before it may be too late to offer more than comfort food.

Please share anything else you wish you could have included in your talk.

70% of heart disease, stroke, diabetes, memory loss, premature wrinkling and impotence are preventable. 80% of cancers and much of asthma and lung disease are preventable, and from environmental causes, like toxin exposure or diet.*  Knowing more about what’s in your food and how it got there can help you take your own health into your own hands, save you money and provide joy and energy for those you love. With culinary medicine, health-conscious people can live life to its youngest.

Ask your doctor, “What do I eat for my condition?”  If he or she doesn’t know, do your own research- here’s my list of resources.

Now it’s time to try John’s Luscious & Rich Garbanzo Guacamole recipe!

1 ripe medium avocado, preferably Haas

1 medium clove of garlic, peeled, diced and creamed with lime zest

1 medium serrano chile pepper, stemmed and diced, but not seeded

1/4 teaspoon minced lime zest, preferably organic

2 tablespoons fresh lime juice (about 1 medium lime)

1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil, COOC preferred

1/2 cup cooked chickpeas, rinsed and drained

1/2 teaspoon yellow curry powder, such as Madras curry

1/4 teaspoon black pepper

5 sturdy springs cilantro or Italian flat leaf parsley (optional)

Cut the avocado in half long-wise around the pit and separate the halves. Remove the pit.

Use a spoon to scoop around the flesh and remove it in one piece.

Place upside down on a cutting board, dice into large chunks. Scoop up and place in a large stainless steel bowl.

Add the garlic, chile, zest, juice and oil, and mix by hand with a fork or a tablespoon.

Smash the chickpeas with the flat side of a chef’s knife, to break the skin. Sprinkle the curry and black pepper on the garbanzos, add to the bowl, mix again, and top with herb garnish if desired.

Serve with corn tortillas or toasted chips, sliced jicama triangles and sliced cucumber circles. Enjoy!

Nutritional Data Per Serving (3 servings):193 calories, 17 g carbs, 14 g fat, 3 g protein, 125 mg sodium, 7 gram fiber.

Adapted from La Puma J. “ChefMD’s Big Book of Culinary Medicine”, Crown, 2008.

(c) John La Puma, MD, Santa Barbara, CA, 10.2013

*See John’s TEDMED bio page for references and resources that support these claims.

Why be normal? Q&A with Rosie King

Rosie King diagnosed herself with a high functioning form of autism (Asperger’s Syndrome) at age nine and has become a spokesperson for autism in the United Kingdom, including hosting an Emmy award winning BBC documentary on the subject. Shortly after her 16th birthday, she spoke on the TEDMED 2014 stage about her journey.

We asked Rosie a few questions to learn more about her remarkable story.

Why does this talk matter now?

I think the ideas I share in my talk have always mattered.  Society is at a stage where it is beginning to understand equality– I want this to move on from addressing racism and sexism, to addressing discrimination in all areas.  This is the only way to have a civilized society.

Gratefully not normal: "I wouldn't trade in my autism and my imagination for the world." Rosie King, TEDMED 2014.
“I wouldn’t trade in my autism and my imagination for the world.” Rosie King, TEDMED 2014. Photo, Sandy Huffaker for TEDMED.

What legacy would you like to leave?

I want everyone in the world to know that it is important to be themselves.  I come from a family where everyone is different.  We could be a sad family but we have always been encouraged to be proud of ourselves and celebrate our talents.  If the whole world was like my family then it would be a joyful world.  I want to take a little bit of my family’s attitude out there.  It could be like flicking a switch, and I hope that my talk will be that switch.  To ask someone to be anything other than who they really are is cruel, like killing their real self.  Also, that genuine self that could bring so much color to the world!

What did you learn at TEDMED?

Denise [TEDMED speaker coach] taught me about body language and how to speak to a big audience–  that was useful.  I also listened to a very interesting talk [Rebecca Adamson] about how Native American people were treated.  This made me very upset but also glad that it was being brought to light.

For all inquiries regarding speaking engagements or to learn more about her current work, please contact Joanna Jones.

Keep up with Rosie and her family on their blog, My Perfectly Imperfect Family, and check out the books Rosie has illustrated authored by her mother, Sharon.